open access

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)
Original paper
Submitted: 2020-05-10
Accepted: 2020-09-21
Published online: 2020-09-30
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Suppression of the inflammation and fibrosis in Asherman syndrome rat model by mesenchymal stem cells: histological and immunohistochemical studies

Naglaa Mohamed Salama1, Somaia Saad Zaghlol1, Hala Hassan Mohamed1, Samaa Samir Kamar1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0024
·
Pubmed: 32996119
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(3):208-218.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Medical Histology and Cell Biology, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt

open access

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2020-05-10
Accepted: 2020-09-21
Published online: 2020-09-30

Abstract

Introduction. Asherman syndrome (AS) is a symptomatic intrauterine adhesion caused by endometrial basal layer fibrosis as a result of either uterine cavity surgery or infection leading to many complications. There is a concern to repair the injured tissues by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). We aimed in this study to develop an animal model of AS and evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of BM-MSCs in this model through histological, immunohistochemical, and morphometric studies. Material and methods. Forty-two adult female adult albino rats were divided into (i) donor group composed of 2 rats used for isolation and propagation of BM-MSCs, and (ii) experimental groups: 40 rats equally divided into 4 groups: GpI (control), GpII (AS model), GpIII (BM-MSCs-treated AS rats), GpIV (untreated AS rats). Histological staining and immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kB) were performed. The results were evaluated by morphometric and statistical analysis. Results. Significant endometrial thinning, fibrosis, and degeneration of the endometrial epithelium with a significant decrease in PCNA and VEGF immunoexpression and a significant increase in NF-kB immunoexpression were detected in GpII and GpIV groups. These changes were substantially reversed in BM-MSCs-treated animals. Conclusions: BM-MSCs treatment resulted in substantial improvement of intrauterine adhesion in the rat model of Asherman syndrome.

Abstract

Introduction. Asherman syndrome (AS) is a symptomatic intrauterine adhesion caused by endometrial basal layer fibrosis as a result of either uterine cavity surgery or infection leading to many complications. There is a concern to repair the injured tissues by using bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs). We aimed in this study to develop an animal model of AS and evaluate the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic effects of BM-MSCs in this model through histological, immunohistochemical, and morphometric studies. Material and methods. Forty-two adult female adult albino rats were divided into (i) donor group composed of 2 rats used for isolation and propagation of BM-MSCs, and (ii) experimental groups: 40 rats equally divided into 4 groups: GpI (control), GpII (AS model), GpIII (BM-MSCs-treated AS rats), GpIV (untreated AS rats). Histological staining and immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kB) were performed. The results were evaluated by morphometric and statistical analysis. Results. Significant endometrial thinning, fibrosis, and degeneration of the endometrial epithelium with a significant decrease in PCNA and VEGF immunoexpression and a significant increase in NF-kB immunoexpression were detected in GpII and GpIV groups. These changes were substantially reversed in BM-MSCs-treated animals. Conclusions: BM-MSCs treatment resulted in substantial improvement of intrauterine adhesion in the rat model of Asherman syndrome.

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Keywords

BM-MSCs; intrauterine adhesions; NF-kB; PCNA; VEGF; IHC

About this article
Title

Suppression of the inflammation and fibrosis in Asherman syndrome rat model by mesenchymal stem cells: histological and immunohistochemical studies

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 3 (2020)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

208-218

Published online

2020-09-30

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0024

Pubmed

32996119

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(3):208-218.

Keywords

BM-MSCs
intrauterine adhesions
NF-kB
PCNA
VEGF
IHC

Authors

Naglaa Mohamed Salama
Somaia Saad Zaghlol
Hala Hassan Mohamed
Samaa Samir Kamar

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