open access

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)
Original paper
Submitted: 2019-09-23
Accepted: 2020-02-06
Published online: 2020-03-16
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MiR-491-3p is down-regulated in postmenopausal osteoporosis and affects growth, differentiation and apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells through targeting CTSS

Wen-Xiong Hu1, Hua Li1, Jia-Zheng Jiang1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2020.0001
·
Pubmed: 32176315
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(1):9-16.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Orthopaedics, Hainan Western Central Hospital, Hainan Province, P.R. China

open access

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2019-09-23
Accepted: 2020-02-06
Published online: 2020-03-16

Abstract

Background. Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is a common disease related to aging, which has been paid increasing attention in recent years because of its serious complications. MiR-491-3p was found to play a crucial roles in several diseases. However, the role of miR-491-3p in PMO has yet not been studied. Our research intends to explore the impact of miR-491-3p on PMO in the in vitro model.

Material and methods. The expression patterns of miR-491-3p and cathepsin S (CTSS) in patients with PMO were acquired from the GEO database. The human osteoblast cell hFOB1.19 was used to detect the function of miR-491-3p and CTSS in PMO. The viability and apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells were measured by cell counting kit 8 and flow cytometry assays. The apoptosis and differentiation related proteins were analyzed by western blotting. The relationship between miR-491-3p and CTSS was predicted by appropriate software and affirmed by luciferase assay.

Results. MiR-491-3p expression was lower in patients with PMO. The up-regulation of miR-491-3p in hFOB1.19 cells increased their viability and differentiation and inhibited their apoptosis. CTSS, which was highly expressed in patients with PMO, was confirmed as a direct target of miR-491-3p and was found to be inversely modulated by miR-491-3p. The rescue assays showed that overexpression of CTSS suppressed the promoting effects of miR-491-3p mimic on the proliferation and differentiation of hFOB1.19 cells, and repressed the inhibitory effects of miR-491-3p mimic on apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells.

Conclusions. The results of our study showed that miR-491-3p could ameliorate biological characteristics of hFOB1.19 cells by reducing CTSS expression suggesting that miR-491-3p/CTSS might be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PMO.

Abstract

Background. Postmenopausal osteoporosis (PMO) is a common disease related to aging, which has been paid increasing attention in recent years because of its serious complications. MiR-491-3p was found to play a crucial roles in several diseases. However, the role of miR-491-3p in PMO has yet not been studied. Our research intends to explore the impact of miR-491-3p on PMO in the in vitro model.

Material and methods. The expression patterns of miR-491-3p and cathepsin S (CTSS) in patients with PMO were acquired from the GEO database. The human osteoblast cell hFOB1.19 was used to detect the function of miR-491-3p and CTSS in PMO. The viability and apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells were measured by cell counting kit 8 and flow cytometry assays. The apoptosis and differentiation related proteins were analyzed by western blotting. The relationship between miR-491-3p and CTSS was predicted by appropriate software and affirmed by luciferase assay.

Results. MiR-491-3p expression was lower in patients with PMO. The up-regulation of miR-491-3p in hFOB1.19 cells increased their viability and differentiation and inhibited their apoptosis. CTSS, which was highly expressed in patients with PMO, was confirmed as a direct target of miR-491-3p and was found to be inversely modulated by miR-491-3p. The rescue assays showed that overexpression of CTSS suppressed the promoting effects of miR-491-3p mimic on the proliferation and differentiation of hFOB1.19 cells, and repressed the inhibitory effects of miR-491-3p mimic on apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells.

Conclusions. The results of our study showed that miR-491-3p could ameliorate biological characteristics of hFOB1.19 cells by reducing CTSS expression suggesting that miR-491-3p/CTSS might be a potential biomarker for the diagnosis and treatment of PMO.

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Keywords

postmenopausal osteoporosis; osteoblastic hFOB1.19 cells; miR-491-3p; cathepsin S; proliferation; apoptosis; flow cytometry

About this article
Title

MiR-491-3p is down-regulated in postmenopausal osteoporosis and affects growth, differentiation and apoptosis of hFOB1.19 cells through targeting CTSS

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 58, No 1 (2020)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

9-16

Published online

2020-03-16

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2020.0001

Pubmed

32176315

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2020;58(1):9-16.

Keywords

postmenopausal osteoporosis
osteoblastic hFOB1.19 cells
miR-491-3p
cathepsin S
proliferation
apoptosis
flow cytometry

Authors

Wen-Xiong Hu
Hua Li
Jia-Zheng Jiang

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