open access

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2018-12-19
Accepted: 2018-12-19
Published online: 2019-01-02
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NKT-like cells reveal higher than T lymphocytes expression of cellular protective proteins HSP70 and SOD2 and comparably increased expression of SIRT1 in the oldest seniors

Lucyna Kaszubowska1, Jerzy Foerster2, Przemysław Kwiatkowski3, Daria Schetz4
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0025
·
Pubmed: 30633320
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(4):231-240.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Histology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Dębinki 1, 80-211 Gdańsk, Poland
  2. Department of Social and Clinical Gerontology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Dębinki 1, 80-211 Gdańsk, Poland
  3. Department of Human Histology and Embryology, Collegium Medicum, Faculty of Medicine, University of Warmia and Masuria in Olsztyn, Warszawska 30, 10-082 Olsztyn, Poland
  4. Department of Pharmacology, Medical University of Gdańsk, Dębowa 23, 80-204 Gdańsk, Poland

open access

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2018-12-19
Accepted: 2018-12-19
Published online: 2019-01-02

Abstract

Introduction. NKT-like cells are “non-classical”, “CD1d-independent” NKT cells which represent highly differentiated, conventional T lymphocytes coexpressing several NK (natural killer) associated receptors. They are effector lymphocytes of both innate and adaptive immunity and simultaneously regulatory cells of the adaptive immune system. They reveal large granular lymphocyte morphology and can mediate both MHC-restricted and MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, secrete many cytokines and modulate Th1 immune responses. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of proteins involved in cellular stress response: sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in NKT-like cells compared to T lymphocytes during ageing.
Material and methods. The study involved three groups of participants: the oldest seniors (n = 25; aged over 85; mean age 88 ± 0.5 ys), the old (n = 30; aged under 85; mean age 76 ± 0.9 ys) and the young (n = 32; mean age 21 ± 0.3 ys). Whole blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry to assess the NKT-like (CD3+CD56+) and T (CD3+) cell populations.
Results. The group of the oldest seniors differed from the other age groups by much higher percentage of both NKT-like cells and T lymphocytes expressing SIRT1, HSP70 and SOD2. The expression of these proteins correlated positively with the age of the participants. Interestingly, the significantly higher expression of the studied protective proteins; i.e. HSP70 and SOD2 was found in CD3+CD56+ cells compared to CD3+ lymphocytes and this phenomenon concerned all the studied age groups. These differences were not significant regarding the expression of SIRT1; however, the same tendency was noticeable.
Conclusions. The analysis of CD3+ and CD3+CD56+ lymphocytes showed the increase in the number of NKT-like cells and decreased number of T cells in the process of ageing. The increased expression of cellular protective proteins SIRT1, HSP70 and SOD2 in NKT-like and T-lymphocytes of the oldest seniors seems to correspond to longevity and the observed correlations may suggest the involvement of these proteins in establishing cellular homeostasis specific for healthy ageing. Furthermore, the higher expression of the protective proteins in NKT-like cells compared to T lymphocytes may indicate their particular role in the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity responses during the process of ageing.

Abstract

Introduction. NKT-like cells are “non-classical”, “CD1d-independent” NKT cells which represent highly differentiated, conventional T lymphocytes coexpressing several NK (natural killer) associated receptors. They are effector lymphocytes of both innate and adaptive immunity and simultaneously regulatory cells of the adaptive immune system. They reveal large granular lymphocyte morphology and can mediate both MHC-restricted and MHC-unrestricted cytotoxicity, secrete many cytokines and modulate Th1 immune responses. The aim of our study was to analyze the expression of proteins involved in cellular stress response: sirtuin 1 (SIRT1), heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) in NKT-like cells compared to T lymphocytes during ageing.
Material and methods. The study involved three groups of participants: the oldest seniors (n = 25; aged over 85; mean age 88 ± 0.5 ys), the old (n = 30; aged under 85; mean age 76 ± 0.9 ys) and the young (n = 32; mean age 21 ± 0.3 ys). Whole blood samples were analyzed by flow cytometry to assess the NKT-like (CD3+CD56+) and T (CD3+) cell populations.
Results. The group of the oldest seniors differed from the other age groups by much higher percentage of both NKT-like cells and T lymphocytes expressing SIRT1, HSP70 and SOD2. The expression of these proteins correlated positively with the age of the participants. Interestingly, the significantly higher expression of the studied protective proteins; i.e. HSP70 and SOD2 was found in CD3+CD56+ cells compared to CD3+ lymphocytes and this phenomenon concerned all the studied age groups. These differences were not significant regarding the expression of SIRT1; however, the same tendency was noticeable.
Conclusions. The analysis of CD3+ and CD3+CD56+ lymphocytes showed the increase in the number of NKT-like cells and decreased number of T cells in the process of ageing. The increased expression of cellular protective proteins SIRT1, HSP70 and SOD2 in NKT-like and T-lymphocytes of the oldest seniors seems to correspond to longevity and the observed correlations may suggest the involvement of these proteins in establishing cellular homeostasis specific for healthy ageing. Furthermore, the higher expression of the protective proteins in NKT-like cells compared to T lymphocytes may indicate their particular role in the interplay between innate and adaptive immunity responses during the process of ageing.

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Keywords

lymphocytes; CD3+ cells; NKT-like cells; CD3+CD56+ cells; ageing; immunosenescence; seniors; SIRT1; HSP70; SOD2

About this article
Title

NKT-like cells reveal higher than T lymphocytes expression of cellular protective proteins HSP70 and SOD2 and comparably increased expression of SIRT1 in the oldest seniors

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 4 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

231-240

Published online

2019-01-02

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0025

Pubmed

30633320

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(4):231-240.

Keywords

lymphocytes
CD3+ cells
NKT-like cells
CD3+CD56+ cells
ageing
immunosenescence
seniors
SIRT1
HSP70
SOD2

Authors

Lucyna Kaszubowska
Jerzy Foerster
Przemysław Kwiatkowski
Daria Schetz

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