open access

Vol 57, No 1 (2019)
Original paper
Submitted: 2018-12-05
Accepted: 2019-03-14
Published online: 2019-03-29
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Immunohistochemical demonstration of LH/CG receptors in non-neoplastic human adrenal cortex and adrenocortical tumors

Piotr Korol1, Maria Jaranowska2, Marek Pawlikowski1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2019.0003
·
Pubmed: 30924919
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(1):23-27.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Geriatrics, Chair of Geriatrics, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland
  2. Department of Neuroendocrinology, Chair of Laboratory Medicine, Pomorska 151, 92-213 Łódź, Poland

open access

Vol 57, No 1 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2018-12-05
Accepted: 2019-03-14
Published online: 2019-03-29

Abstract

Introduction. Numerous data indicate that luteinizing hormone and/or chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) exert direct actions on the adrenal cortex and are involved in the adrenal pathology. However, the immunohistochemical studies on the expression of LH/CG receptors (LH/CGR) in the human adrenal cortex and in the adrenocortical tumors are scarce. Material and methods. Paraffin sections of samples of 6 human non-neoplastic adrenal cortex and 25 adrenocortical tumors were immunostained with anti-LH/CGR polyclonal antibody. Results. All zones of the human non-neoplastic adrenal cortex present a positive immunoreaction with anti-LH/CGR antibody showing the strongest reaction in cell membranes. The LH/CGR immunostaining in the vast majority of hormonally non-functioning adenomas and in all hormone-secreting adenomas does not differ from the non-neoplastic adrenal cortex. In contrast to non-neoplastic adrenal cortex and benign adenomas, in adrenocortical cancers the immunostaining with anti-LH/CGR antibody behaves differently. The immunopositive material is almost totally filling the cytoplasm of the cells but the immunopositivity of cell membranes is weak or lacking.

Conclusions. The data presented in our study show that the expression of LH/CGR in adrenocortical tumors is not ectopic but eutopic. The immunohistochemical examination of LH/CGR may be useful in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions in the adrenal cortex. Moreover, the loss of membrane localization of LH/CGR in adrenocortical cancer suggests the alteration of receptors’ function.  

Abstract

Introduction. Numerous data indicate that luteinizing hormone and/or chorionic gonadotropin (LH/CG) exert direct actions on the adrenal cortex and are involved in the adrenal pathology. However, the immunohistochemical studies on the expression of LH/CG receptors (LH/CGR) in the human adrenal cortex and in the adrenocortical tumors are scarce. Material and methods. Paraffin sections of samples of 6 human non-neoplastic adrenal cortex and 25 adrenocortical tumors were immunostained with anti-LH/CGR polyclonal antibody. Results. All zones of the human non-neoplastic adrenal cortex present a positive immunoreaction with anti-LH/CGR antibody showing the strongest reaction in cell membranes. The LH/CGR immunostaining in the vast majority of hormonally non-functioning adenomas and in all hormone-secreting adenomas does not differ from the non-neoplastic adrenal cortex. In contrast to non-neoplastic adrenal cortex and benign adenomas, in adrenocortical cancers the immunostaining with anti-LH/CGR antibody behaves differently. The immunopositive material is almost totally filling the cytoplasm of the cells but the immunopositivity of cell membranes is weak or lacking.

Conclusions. The data presented in our study show that the expression of LH/CGR in adrenocortical tumors is not ectopic but eutopic. The immunohistochemical examination of LH/CGR may be useful in the differentiation between benign and malignant lesions in the adrenal cortex. Moreover, the loss of membrane localization of LH/CGR in adrenocortical cancer suggests the alteration of receptors’ function.  

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Keywords

adrenal cortex; adrenocortical adenomas; adrenocortical cancer; luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor

About this article
Title

Immunohistochemical demonstration of LH/CG receptors in non-neoplastic human adrenal cortex and adrenocortical tumors

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 57, No 1 (2019)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

23-27

Published online

2019-03-29

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2019.0003

Pubmed

30924919

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2019;57(1):23-27.

Keywords

adrenal cortex
adrenocortical adenomas
adrenocortical cancer
luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor

Authors

Piotr Korol
Maria Jaranowska
Marek Pawlikowski

References (17)
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