open access

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2018-05-30
Accepted: 2018-08-10
Published online: 2018-08-30
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Expression of peroxiredoxins in the human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa and their role in preventing H2O2-induced damage to spermatozoa

Hui Shi1, Juan Liu2, Peng Zhu2, Haiyan Wang2, Zhenjun Zhao1, Guohong Sun3, Jianyuan Li14
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0019
·
Pubmed: 30187908
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):141-150.
Affiliations
  1. College of Life Science, Yantai University (Yantai, Shandong Province, 264005 PR China)
  2. Yantai Yuhuangding Hospital (Yantai, Shandong Province, 264000, PR China)
  3. Yantai Vocational College (Yantai, Shandong Province, 264670, PR China)
  4. Key Laboratory of Male Reproductive Health, National Health and Family Planning Commission (Beijing, 100081, PR China)

open access

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2018-05-30
Accepted: 2018-08-10
Published online: 2018-08-30

Abstract

Introduction. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have potential toxic effects on testicular function and sperm quality. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are enzymes with a role as ROS scavenger. The aim of the study was to reveal the presence and localization of PRDXs in human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa, and the protective roles of PRDX2 and PRDX6 in sperm motility. Material and methods. The presence and localization of PRDXs in the human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa were detected by immunohistochemistry, western blot and immunofluorescence. The effect of anti-peroxidative damage to spermatozoa was examined by adding H2O2 to the recombinant protein-treated spermatozoa. Results. There were strong signals of PRDX1 in spermatogonia and round spermatids; PRDX2 in the round spermatids; PRDX4 and 5 in spermatogonia; PRDX6 in Sertoli cells. PRDXs were also found in epididymal epithelial cells where the expression of PRDX1, 4, 5, 6 in the cauda was higher than in the caput of epididymis. PRDX1-6 immunoreactivity was found throughout acrosome, post-acrosomal region, equatorial segment, neck and cytoplasmic droplet, midpiece and principal piece. The H2O2-induced reduction in sperm motility was reversed by recombinant PRDX2 or PRDX6 in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusions. PRDX1-6 in the human testis and epididymis presented cell-specificity. PRDX2 and 6 are potential antioxidant protectors for human spermatozoa.

Abstract

Introduction. High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have potential toxic effects on testicular function and sperm quality. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are enzymes with a role as ROS scavenger. The aim of the study was to reveal the presence and localization of PRDXs in human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa, and the protective roles of PRDX2 and PRDX6 in sperm motility. Material and methods. The presence and localization of PRDXs in the human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa were detected by immunohistochemistry, western blot and immunofluorescence. The effect of anti-peroxidative damage to spermatozoa was examined by adding H2O2 to the recombinant protein-treated spermatozoa. Results. There were strong signals of PRDX1 in spermatogonia and round spermatids; PRDX2 in the round spermatids; PRDX4 and 5 in spermatogonia; PRDX6 in Sertoli cells. PRDXs were also found in epididymal epithelial cells where the expression of PRDX1, 4, 5, 6 in the cauda was higher than in the caput of epididymis. PRDX1-6 immunoreactivity was found throughout acrosome, post-acrosomal region, equatorial segment, neck and cytoplasmic droplet, midpiece and principal piece. The H2O2-induced reduction in sperm motility was reversed by recombinant PRDX2 or PRDX6 in a dose-dependent manner.

Conclusions. PRDX1-6 in the human testis and epididymis presented cell-specificity. PRDX2 and 6 are potential antioxidant protectors for human spermatozoa.

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Keywords

Peroxiredoxins; human; testis; epididymis; spermatozoa

About this article
Title

Expression of peroxiredoxins in the human testis, epididymis and spermatozoa and their role in preventing H2O2-induced damage to spermatozoa

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

141-150

Published online

2018-08-30

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0019

Pubmed

30187908

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):141-150.

Keywords

Peroxiredoxins
human
testis
epididymis
spermatozoa

Authors

Hui Shi
Juan Liu
Peng Zhu
Haiyan Wang
Zhenjun Zhao
Guohong Sun
Jianyuan Li

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