open access

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-12-11
Accepted: 2018-06-18
Published online: 2018-08-02
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Effects of genistein on insulin pathway-related genes in mouse differentiated myoblast C2C12 cell line: evidence for two independent modes of action

Slawomir Lewicki1, Aneta Lewicka2, Boleslaw Kalicki3, Agnieszka Sobolewska-Ruta4, Bogdan Debski5, Robert Zdanowski1, Tomasz Syryło6, Malgorzata Kloc78, Jacek Z. Kubiak19
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0014
·
Pubmed: 29998457
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):123-132.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Regenerative Medicine and Cell Biology, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw, Poland, Warsaw, Poland
  2. Independent Laboratory of Epidemiology, Military Institute of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Warsaw, Poland, Poland
  3. Paediatric, Nephrology and Allergology Clinic, Military Institute of Medicine, Szaserów 128, 01-141 Warsaw, Poland
  4. Bioengineering Department, The Institute of Biotechnology and Antibiotics, Warsaw, Poland, Poland
  5. Division of Biochemistry, Department of Physiological Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Warsaw University of Life Sciences – SGGW, Nowoursynowska 166, 02-787 Warsaw, Poland
  6. Department of Urology, Military Institute of Medicine, Szaserów 128, 01-141 Warsaw, Poland
  7. The Houston Methodist Hospital and The Houston Methodist Research Institute, Department of surgery, Houston, Texas, United States
  8. University of Texas, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston TX, United States
  9. Univ Rennes, CNRS, IGDR — Institute of Genetics and Development of Rennes, UMR 6290, Cell Cycle Group, Faculty of Medicine, 35043 Rennes, France, France

open access

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-12-11
Accepted: 2018-06-18
Published online: 2018-08-02

Abstract

Introduction. Genistein (plant isoflavone) is a well-known anti-cancer drug with estrogenic-like properties. Genistein also regulates sugar and lipid metabolism; thus, it has anti-diabetic properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro effects of genistein on glucose transport, fatty acids oxidation, activation of PKB, and expression of genes related to insulin pathway in differentiated myoblast C2C12 mouse cell line.

Material and methods. Differentiated myoblast C2C12 mouse cell line was used to assess the effects of different genistein concentrations on glucose transport and fatty acids oxidation measured by radioactivity technique, activation of PKB, and expression of selected genes related to insulin signaling pathway (IR-a, IR-b, IRS-1, PKB, GLUT-4, PP2A, SH-PTP2) at the mRNA and protein levels. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of genistein under standard conditions for 0–48 hours.
Results. Genistein in low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) significantly increased glucose transport and decreased fatty acids oxidation in C2C12 cells after 48 h of incubation. High concentration of genistein (50 μM) had the opposite effect. Genistein stimulated PKB phosphorylation during the first 5–10 minutes of incubation. There was no significant impact on the protein expression of selected genes (IR-a, IR-b, IRS-1, PKB, GLUT-4, PP2A-Ca, ER-a and ER-b) after 48 h treatment. We observed inverse correlation between genistein concentration and the expression of SH-PTP2 protein. Genistein affected the expression pattern of mRNAs for genes related to the insulin pathway, however, not the expression of the encoded proteins.

Conclusions. The results of this study showed that depending on the concentration and time of incubation genistein significantly affects glucose and lipid metabolism and at low concentration modifies expression pattern
of a few genes in C2C12 cells.

Abstract

Introduction. Genistein (plant isoflavone) is a well-known anti-cancer drug with estrogenic-like properties. Genistein also regulates sugar and lipid metabolism; thus, it has anti-diabetic properties. The aim of the study was to evaluate in vitro effects of genistein on glucose transport, fatty acids oxidation, activation of PKB, and expression of genes related to insulin pathway in differentiated myoblast C2C12 mouse cell line.

Material and methods. Differentiated myoblast C2C12 mouse cell line was used to assess the effects of different genistein concentrations on glucose transport and fatty acids oxidation measured by radioactivity technique, activation of PKB, and expression of selected genes related to insulin signaling pathway (IR-a, IR-b, IRS-1, PKB, GLUT-4, PP2A, SH-PTP2) at the mRNA and protein levels. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of genistein under standard conditions for 0–48 hours.
Results. Genistein in low concentrations (0.1–1 μM) significantly increased glucose transport and decreased fatty acids oxidation in C2C12 cells after 48 h of incubation. High concentration of genistein (50 μM) had the opposite effect. Genistein stimulated PKB phosphorylation during the first 5–10 minutes of incubation. There was no significant impact on the protein expression of selected genes (IR-a, IR-b, IRS-1, PKB, GLUT-4, PP2A-Ca, ER-a and ER-b) after 48 h treatment. We observed inverse correlation between genistein concentration and the expression of SH-PTP2 protein. Genistein affected the expression pattern of mRNAs for genes related to the insulin pathway, however, not the expression of the encoded proteins.

Conclusions. The results of this study showed that depending on the concentration and time of incubation genistein significantly affects glucose and lipid metabolism and at low concentration modifies expression pattern
of a few genes in C2C12 cells.

Get Citation

Keywords

genistein; C2C12 cell line; glucose transport; insulin pathway proteins; fatty acids oxidation

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Title

Effects of genistein on insulin pathway-related genes in mouse differentiated myoblast C2C12 cell line: evidence for two independent modes of action

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

123-132

Published online

2018-08-02

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0014

Pubmed

29998457

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):123-132.

Keywords

genistein
C2C12 cell line
glucose transport
insulin pathway proteins
fatty acids oxidation

Authors

Slawomir Lewicki
Aneta Lewicka
Boleslaw Kalicki
Agnieszka Sobolewska-Ruta
Bogdan Debski
Robert Zdanowski
Tomasz Syryło
Malgorzata Kloc
Jacek Z. Kubiak

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