open access

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-11-08
Accepted: 2018-05-08
Published online: 2018-05-14
Get Citation

Effects of massage on the expression of proangiogenic markers in rat skin

Katarzyna Ratajczak-Wielgomas1, Krzysztof Kassolik23, Jedrzej Grzegrzolka1, Tomasz Halski3, Aleksandra Piotrowska1, Katarzyna Mieszala1, Iwona Wilk2, Marzenna Podhorska-Okolow1, Piotr Dziegiel12, Waldemar Andrzejewski23
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0008
·
Pubmed: 29770958
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(2):83-91.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Histology and Embryology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland, Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Department of Physiotherapy, University School of Physical Education, Wroclaw, Poland
  3. Public Higher Medical Professional School, Opole, Poland

open access

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-11-08
Accepted: 2018-05-08
Published online: 2018-05-14

Abstract

Introduction. Massage is a physiotherapeutic treatment, commonly used in both therapy and restoration of normal body functions. The aim of this work was to determine the effects of skin massage on stimulating the expression of angiogenesis-initiating factors, i.e. VEGF-A, FGF-2 (bFGF) and CD34 and on skin regeneration processes.

Material and methods. The study was conducted on 48 Buffalo strain rats, randomly divided into two groups. In the first group (M, the massaged group), massage was applied five times a week for 7 weeks. In the second study group (C, the control group), the massage was omitted. Massage consisted of spiral movements at the plantar surface of skin for 5 min on each rear extremity. The gene expression of proangiogenic factors, including VEGF-A, FGF-2, CD34 at the mRNA level was determined using real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections of rat skin to determine VEGF-A, FGF-2 CD34 and Ki-67expression.

Results. An increase in mRNA expression in the skin of the rat’s rear extremity for VEGF-A and FGF-2 in the first week of the experiment was shown in the M group compared with the control rats. The upregulation of CD34 mRNA expression was also observed in the M group. We observed positive correlations between VEGF-A mRNA expression and the expression of mRNA for FGF-2 and CD34, as well as correlation between the expression of mRNA for FGF-2 and CD34. The immunohistochemical expression of VEGF-A, FGF-2 and CD34 was at a much lower level in the skin of control rats relative to the skin of massaged animals. Moreover, significantly higher immunoreactivity was shown for nuclear protein Ki-67 in epidermal cells in the M group compared with the C group.

Conclusions. Rat skin massage increased the expression of the main angiogenesis-stimulating factors and the proliferative activity of epidermal cells, which can stimulate skin regeneration and tissue repairing processes.

Abstract

Introduction. Massage is a physiotherapeutic treatment, commonly used in both therapy and restoration of normal body functions. The aim of this work was to determine the effects of skin massage on stimulating the expression of angiogenesis-initiating factors, i.e. VEGF-A, FGF-2 (bFGF) and CD34 and on skin regeneration processes.

Material and methods. The study was conducted on 48 Buffalo strain rats, randomly divided into two groups. In the first group (M, the massaged group), massage was applied five times a week for 7 weeks. In the second study group (C, the control group), the massage was omitted. Massage consisted of spiral movements at the plantar surface of skin for 5 min on each rear extremity. The gene expression of proangiogenic factors, including VEGF-A, FGF-2, CD34 at the mRNA level was determined using real-time PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed on paraffin sections of rat skin to determine VEGF-A, FGF-2 CD34 and Ki-67expression.

Results. An increase in mRNA expression in the skin of the rat’s rear extremity for VEGF-A and FGF-2 in the first week of the experiment was shown in the M group compared with the control rats. The upregulation of CD34 mRNA expression was also observed in the M group. We observed positive correlations between VEGF-A mRNA expression and the expression of mRNA for FGF-2 and CD34, as well as correlation between the expression of mRNA for FGF-2 and CD34. The immunohistochemical expression of VEGF-A, FGF-2 and CD34 was at a much lower level in the skin of control rats relative to the skin of massaged animals. Moreover, significantly higher immunoreactivity was shown for nuclear protein Ki-67 in epidermal cells in the M group compared with the C group.

Conclusions. Rat skin massage increased the expression of the main angiogenesis-stimulating factors and the proliferative activity of epidermal cells, which can stimulate skin regeneration and tissue repairing processes.

Get Citation

Keywords

rat; skin; massage; VEGF-A; FGF-2; CD34; Ki-67; qPCR; IHC

About this article
Title

Effects of massage on the expression of proangiogenic markers in rat skin

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

83-91

Published online

2018-05-14

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0008

Pubmed

29770958

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(2):83-91.

Keywords

rat
skin
massage
VEGF-A
FGF-2
CD34
Ki-67
qPCR
IHC

Authors

Katarzyna Ratajczak-Wielgomas
Krzysztof Kassolik
Jedrzej Grzegrzolka
Tomasz Halski
Aleksandra Piotrowska
Katarzyna Mieszala
Iwona Wilk
Marzenna Podhorska-Okolow
Piotr Dziegiel
Waldemar Andrzejewski

References (26)
  1. Field T. Massage therapy research review. Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice. 2016; 24: 19–31.
  2. Viravud Y, Apichartvorakit A, Mutirangura P, et al. The anatomical study of the major signal points of the court-type Thai traditional massage on legs and their effects on blood flow and skin temperature. J Integr Med. 2017; 15(2): 142–150.
  3. Shin MS, Sung YH. Effects of Massage on Muscular Strength and Proprioception After Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage. J Strength Cond Res. 2015; 29(8): 2255–2260.
  4. Phuong C, Maibach H. Effect of massage on percutaneous penetration and skin decontamination: man and animal. Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology. 2015: 1–4.
  5. Hoff PM, Machado KK. Role of angiogenesis in the pathogenesis of cancer. Cancer Treat Rev. 2012; 38(7): 825–833.
  6. De Palma M, Biziato D, Petrova TV. Microenvironmental regulation of tumour angiogenesis. Nat Rev Cancer. 2017; 17(8): 457–474.
  7. Potente M, Gerhardt H, Carmeliet P. Basic and therapeutic aspects of angiogenesis. Cell. 2011; 146(6): 873–887.
  8. Niu G, Chen X. Vascular endothelial growth factor as an anti-angiogenic target for cancer therapy. Curr Drug Targets. 2010; 11(8): 1000–1017.
  9. Lieu C, Heymach J, Overman M, et al. Beyond VEGF: inhibition of the fibroblast growth factor pathway and antiangiogenesis. Clin Cancer Res. 2011; 17(19): 6130–6139.
  10. Cao Y. VEGF-targeted cancer therapeutics-paradoxical effects in endocrine organs. Nat Rev Endocrinol. 2014; 10(9): 530–539.
  11. Eichholz A, Merchant S, Gaya AM. Anti-angiogenesis therapies: their potential in cancer management. Onco Targets Ther. 2010; 3: 69–82.
  12. Ribatti D. The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells. An historical review. Leuk Res. 2007; 31(4): 439–444.
  13. Nagatsuka H, Hibi K, Gunduz M, et al. Various immunostaining patterns of CD31, CD34 and endoglin and their relationship with lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinomas. J Oral Pathol Med. 2005; 34(2): 70–76.
  14. Corselli M, Chen CW, Crisan M, et al. Perivascular ancestors of adult multipotent stem cells. Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol. 2010; 30(6): 1104–1109.
  15. Andrzejewski W, Kassolik K, Dziegiel P, et al. Effects of synergistic massage and physical exercise on the expression of angiogenic markers in rat tendons. Biomed Res Int. 2014; 2014: 878095.
  16. Andrzejewski W, Kassolik K, Kobierzycki C, et al. Increased skeletal muscle expression of VEGF induced by massage and exercise. Folia Histochem Cytobiol. 2015; 53(2): 145–151.
  17. Andrzejewski W, Kassolik K, Dziegiel P, et al. Massage may initiate tendon structural changes--a preliminary study. In Vivo. 2015; 29(3): 365–369.
  18. Erba P, Ogawa R, Ackermann M, et al. Angiogenesis in wounds treated by microdeformational wound therapy. Ann Surg. 2011; 253(2): 402–409.
  19. Xia CY, Yu AX, Qi B, et al. Analysis of blood flow and local expression of angiogenesis‑associated growth factors in infected wounds treated with negative pressure wound therapy. Mol Med Rep. 2014; 9(5): 1749–1754.
  20. Jacobs S, Simhaee DA, Marsano A, et al. Efficacy and mechanisms of vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy in promoting wound healing: a rodent model. J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg. 2009; 62(10): 1331–1338.
  21. Dymarek R, Halski T, Ptaszkowski K, et al. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy as an adjunct wound treatment: a systematic review of the literature. Ostomy Wound Manage. 2014; 60(7): 26–39.
  22. Zhang Li, Weng C, Zhao Z, et al. Extracorporeal shock wave therapy for chronic wounds: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Wound Repair Regen. 2017; 25(4): 697–706.
  23. Stojadinovic A, Elster EA, Anam K, et al. Angiogenic response to extracorporeal shock wave treatment in murine skin isografts. Angiogenesis. 2008; 11(4): 369–380.
  24. Kuo YR, Wang CT, Wang FS, et al. Extracorporeal shock-wave therapy enhanced wound healing via increasing topical blood perfusion and tissue regeneration in a rat model of STZ-induced diabetes. Wound Repair Regen. 2009; 17(4): 522–530.
  25. Asadi MR, Torkaman G, Hedayati M. Effect of sensory and motor electrical stimulation in vascular endothelial growth factor expression of muscle and skin in full-thickness wound. J Rehabil Res Dev. 2011; 48(3): 195–201.
  26. Sezer E, Böer-Auer A, Cetin E, et al. Diagnostic utility of Ki-67 and Cyclin D1 immunostaining in differentiation of psoriasis vs. other psoriasiform dermatitis. Dermatol Pract Concept. 2015; 5(3): 7–13.

Regulations

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl