open access

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-08-04
Accepted: 2018-05-24
Published online: 2018-06-04
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The concentration of ethanol affects its penetration rate in bovine cardiac and hepatic tissues

Matthew Dunster-Jones1, Michelle Steicke1, James Mackie1, Rachel Guthrie1, Tam Nguyen Dinh1, Fahima Ahmady1, Jonathan Golledge23, Yutang Wang1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0009
·
Pubmed: 29873057
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(2):92-97.
Affiliations
  1. School of Applied and Biomedical Sciences, Federation University Australia, 3350 Ballarat, Australia
  2. The Vascular Biology Unit, Queensland Research Centre for Peripheral Vascular Disease, College of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, Townsville, Australia
  3. Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, The Townsville Hospital, Townsville, Australia

open access

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-08-04
Accepted: 2018-05-24
Published online: 2018-06-04

Abstract

  Introduction. Ethanol is a commonly used fixative. Fixation of the inner layers of the tissue depends on the ability of the fixative to diffuse into the tissue. It is unknown whether the concentration of ethanol affects its penetration into tissues. This study aimed to compare the penetration rates of 50% and 100% ethanol into bovine heart and liver tissues. Materials and methods. The penetration distance and tissue shrinkage or expansion were measured by analysing the digital images of the heart and liver tissues before and after immersion in ethanol at 20°C for 2, 6, 24 or 30 hours. The penetration coefficients were calculated as the slope of the regression line using the linear regres­sion function between the penetration distance and square root of fixation time. Differences in tissue shrinkage or expansion and penetration distance at various time points between the two concentrations of ethanol were analysed using a mixed design ANOVA followed by Bonferroni’s post-hoc test. Results. The penetration distance of 100% ethanol was significantly greater in both heart and liver tissues com­pared with that of 50% ethanol (n = 4, p < 0.05 for both). 100% ethanol shrank immersed liver tissue signifi­cantly more than 50% ethanol (p = 0.002), but the shrinkage of the heart tissue caused by two concentrations of ethanol did not significantly differ (p = 0.054). The greater penetration distance of 100% over 50% ethanol remained unchanged after normalising the penetration distance to the individual tissue’s shrinkage (n = 4, p < 0.001). The mean penetration coefficient of 100% ethanol was significantly greater than 50% ethanol in the heart tissue (0.906 vs. 0.442, p = 0.003) and in the liver tissue (0.988 vs. 0.622, p = 0.028). Conclusions. It was proven that in two types of tissue that substantially differ in histological structures, 100% ethanol penetrated tissue significantly faster than 50% ethanol.

Abstract

  Introduction. Ethanol is a commonly used fixative. Fixation of the inner layers of the tissue depends on the ability of the fixative to diffuse into the tissue. It is unknown whether the concentration of ethanol affects its penetration into tissues. This study aimed to compare the penetration rates of 50% and 100% ethanol into bovine heart and liver tissues. Materials and methods. The penetration distance and tissue shrinkage or expansion were measured by analysing the digital images of the heart and liver tissues before and after immersion in ethanol at 20°C for 2, 6, 24 or 30 hours. The penetration coefficients were calculated as the slope of the regression line using the linear regres­sion function between the penetration distance and square root of fixation time. Differences in tissue shrinkage or expansion and penetration distance at various time points between the two concentrations of ethanol were analysed using a mixed design ANOVA followed by Bonferroni’s post-hoc test. Results. The penetration distance of 100% ethanol was significantly greater in both heart and liver tissues com­pared with that of 50% ethanol (n = 4, p < 0.05 for both). 100% ethanol shrank immersed liver tissue signifi­cantly more than 50% ethanol (p = 0.002), but the shrinkage of the heart tissue caused by two concentrations of ethanol did not significantly differ (p = 0.054). The greater penetration distance of 100% over 50% ethanol remained unchanged after normalising the penetration distance to the individual tissue’s shrinkage (n = 4, p < 0.001). The mean penetration coefficient of 100% ethanol was significantly greater than 50% ethanol in the heart tissue (0.906 vs. 0.442, p = 0.003) and in the liver tissue (0.988 vs. 0.622, p = 0.028). Conclusions. It was proven that in two types of tissue that substantially differ in histological structures, 100% ethanol penetrated tissue significantly faster than 50% ethanol.

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Keywords

fixative; ethanol; concentration; penetration coefficient; penetration rate

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About this article
Title

The concentration of ethanol affects its penetration rate in bovine cardiac and hepatic tissues

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 2 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

92-97

Published online

2018-06-04

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0009

Pubmed

29873057

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(2):92-97.

Keywords

fixative
ethanol
concentration
penetration coefficient
penetration rate

Authors

Matthew Dunster-Jones
Michelle Steicke
James Mackie
Rachel Guthrie
Tam Nguyen Dinh
Fahima Ahmady
Jonathan Golledge
Yutang Wang

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