open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-06-26
Accepted: 2017-09-25
Published online: 2017-10-02
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Reliability of histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry of a single biopsy for evaluation of endometrial health in Icelandic mares

Monika Sikora1, Marcin Nowak2, Henryk Racheniuk3, Katarzyna Wojtysiak1, Roland Kozdrowski1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2017.0017
·
Pubmed: 28994097
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):168-175.
Affiliations
  1. Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Reproduction and Clinic of Farm Animals, Plac Grunwaldzki Street 49, 50366 Wroclaw, Poland
  2. Wroclaw University of Environmental and Life Sciences, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Pathology, C.K. Norwida Street 31, 50375 Wroclaw, Poland
  3. Opole University of Technology, Faculty of Physiotherapy and Physical Education, Institute of Physiotherapy, Prószkowska Street 76, 45758 Opole, Poland

open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-06-26
Accepted: 2017-09-25
Published online: 2017-10-02

Abstract

Introduction. Endometritis and endometrosis have been and still are the major reasons for infertility in mares. The diagnosis of endometritis can be based on cytology and microbiology, but endometrial biopsy is still the only way to diagnose endometrosis in the mare. Our study attempted to determine if a single biopsy using his­topathology and immunohistochemistry is sufficient to ascertain reasons for infertility in Icelandic mares. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between deviations in endometrial biopsies in terms of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS-2) and fibronectin expression and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) infiltration, as well as scoring degeneration in two endometrial biopsies.

Material and methods. Materials were collected from 53 Icelandic breed mares, from whom two endometrial biopsies were collected and they were used for histopathology and for immunohistochemistry for PTGS-2 and fibronectin.

Results. In our study, twenty-six of 53 mares (49%) showed differences in the biopsy score between the left and the right uterine horns (p = 0.002). There were statistically significant differences in fibronectin expression (p = 0.001), as well as in PTGS-2 expression in the superficial epithelium (p = 0.017).

Conclusions. Significant differences in the biopsy score, and fibronectin and PTGS-2 expression, between two endometrial biopsies obtained from individual mares demonstrated that a single biopsy could be insufficient for diagnosing uterine health status in Icelandic mares.

Abstract

Introduction. Endometritis and endometrosis have been and still are the major reasons for infertility in mares. The diagnosis of endometritis can be based on cytology and microbiology, but endometrial biopsy is still the only way to diagnose endometrosis in the mare. Our study attempted to determine if a single biopsy using his­topathology and immunohistochemistry is sufficient to ascertain reasons for infertility in Icelandic mares. The objectives of this study were to examine the relationship between deviations in endometrial biopsies in terms of prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase-2 (PTGS-2) and fibronectin expression and polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs) infiltration, as well as scoring degeneration in two endometrial biopsies.

Material and methods. Materials were collected from 53 Icelandic breed mares, from whom two endometrial biopsies were collected and they were used for histopathology and for immunohistochemistry for PTGS-2 and fibronectin.

Results. In our study, twenty-six of 53 mares (49%) showed differences in the biopsy score between the left and the right uterine horns (p = 0.002). There were statistically significant differences in fibronectin expression (p = 0.001), as well as in PTGS-2 expression in the superficial epithelium (p = 0.017).

Conclusions. Significant differences in the biopsy score, and fibronectin and PTGS-2 expression, between two endometrial biopsies obtained from individual mares demonstrated that a single biopsy could be insufficient for diagnosing uterine health status in Icelandic mares.

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Keywords

mare; infertility; endometritis; histopathology; fibronectin; prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase- 2; IHC

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About this article
Title

Reliability of histopathological examination and immunohistochemistry of a single biopsy for evaluation of endometrial health in Icelandic mares

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

168-175

Published online

2017-10-02

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2017.0017

Pubmed

28994097

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):168-175.

Keywords

mare
infertility
endometritis
histopathology
fibronectin
prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase- 2
IHC

Authors

Monika Sikora
Marcin Nowak
Henryk Racheniuk
Katarzyna Wojtysiak
Roland Kozdrowski

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