open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-05-19
Accepted: 2017-08-14
Published online: 2017-08-18
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The feasibility of the CD271+ and CD271– mesenchymal stromal cell enrichment toward nucleus pulposus-like cells

Katarzyna Jezierska-Wozniak12, Monika Barczewska1, Aleksandra Habich12, Pawel Wojtacha3, Wanda Badowska4, Wojciech Maksymowicz1, Joanna Wojtkiewicz235
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2017.0013
·
Pubmed: 28925497
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):114-123.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland;
  2. Laboratory for Regenerative Medicine, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury, Olsztyn, Poland;
  3. Department of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland;
  4. Department of Clinical Pediatrics, Faculty of Medical Sciences, University of Warmia and Mazury in Olsztyn, Poland
  5. Foundation for the Nerve Cells Regeneration

open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-05-19
Accepted: 2017-08-14
Published online: 2017-08-18

Abstract

Introduction. Factors promoting nerve cell ingrowth are considered responsible for chronic back pain resulting from the intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). One of the recent exploratory IDD treatments is stem cell transplantation therapy. The CD271 (low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor) has been identified as a mark­er of the most homogeneous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) subset. It is capable of promoting differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and producing significantly higher levels of cytokines as compared to the total population of plastic adherence-mesenchymal stem cells (PA-MSCs).

We investigated the ability of CD271+ MSCs to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of intervertebral disc. We also examined CD271– MSCs, using PA-MSCs as a control cell population.

Material and methods. Bone marrow derived PA-MSCs and its two subsets, CD271– MSCs and CD271+ MSCs, were seeded in collagen scaffolds. After two weeks of growth in NP-differentiation medium, RNA was isolated from cells-scaffold constructs and was analyzed by q-PCR for expression of NP markers. Glycosaminoglycans were analyzed biochemically directly in cells-scaffold constructs.

Results. Expression of NP markers — extracellular matrix components such as aggrecan, collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans on both RNA and the protein levels — was significantly higher in CD271– MSCs compared to the CD271+ MSCs and PA-MSCs cell populations.

Conclusions. CD271– MSCs may be superior candidates for NP restorative treatment compared to CD271+ MSCs and PA-MSCs due to their ability of expressing NP-supporting extracellular matrix components at levels higher than the other two studied MSC subsets.

Abstract

Introduction. Factors promoting nerve cell ingrowth are considered responsible for chronic back pain resulting from the intervertebral disc degeneration (IDD). One of the recent exploratory IDD treatments is stem cell transplantation therapy. The CD271 (low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor) has been identified as a mark­er of the most homogeneous mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) subset. It is capable of promoting differentiation along adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic lineages and producing significantly higher levels of cytokines as compared to the total population of plastic adherence-mesenchymal stem cells (PA-MSCs).

We investigated the ability of CD271+ MSCs to differentiate into chondrocyte-like cells of the nucleus pulposus (NP) of intervertebral disc. We also examined CD271– MSCs, using PA-MSCs as a control cell population.

Material and methods. Bone marrow derived PA-MSCs and its two subsets, CD271– MSCs and CD271+ MSCs, were seeded in collagen scaffolds. After two weeks of growth in NP-differentiation medium, RNA was isolated from cells-scaffold constructs and was analyzed by q-PCR for expression of NP markers. Glycosaminoglycans were analyzed biochemically directly in cells-scaffold constructs.

Results. Expression of NP markers — extracellular matrix components such as aggrecan, collagen type II and glycosaminoglycans on both RNA and the protein levels — was significantly higher in CD271– MSCs compared to the CD271+ MSCs and PA-MSCs cell populations.

Conclusions. CD271– MSCs may be superior candidates for NP restorative treatment compared to CD271+ MSCs and PA-MSCs due to their ability of expressing NP-supporting extracellular matrix components at levels higher than the other two studied MSC subsets.

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Keywords

mesenchymal stem cells; CD271; intervertebral disc regeneration; chondrocyte-like cells; differentiation

About this article
Title

The feasibility of the CD271+ and CD271– mesenchymal stromal cell enrichment toward nucleus pulposus-like cells

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

114-123

Published online

2017-08-18

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2017.0013

Pubmed

28925497

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):114-123.

Keywords

mesenchymal stem cells
CD271
intervertebral disc regeneration
chondrocyte-like cells
differentiation

Authors

Katarzyna Jezierska-Wozniak
Monika Barczewska
Aleksandra Habich
Pawel Wojtacha
Wanda Badowska
Wojciech Maksymowicz
Joanna Wojtkiewicz

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