open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
Original paper
Submitted: 2017-05-11
Accepted: 2017-09-16
Published online: 2017-09-29
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Impaired expression of testicular androgen receptor and collagen fibers in the testis of diabetic rats under HAART: the role of Hypoxis hemerocallidea

Onanuga O. Ismail12, Jegede A. Isaac13, Offor Ugochukwu1, Ogedengbe O. Oluwatosin1, Peter I. Aniekan1, Naidu C.S. Edwin1, Azu O. Onyemaechi14
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2017.0016
·
Pubmed: 28994096
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):149-158.
Affiliations
  1. Discipline of Clinical Anatomy, School of Laboratory Medicine and Medical Sciences, Nelson R. Mandela School of Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, 719, UMBILO ROAD, DURBAN, 40001 DURBAN, South Africa
  2. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Kampala International University, Dar es salaam, Tanzania, United Republic Of
  3. Department of Anatomy, Faculty of Basic Medical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Ladoke Akintola University of Technology, Ogbomoso, Nigeria
  4. Department of Anatomy, School of Medicine, Windhoek, University of Namibia, Namibia

open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2017-05-11
Accepted: 2017-09-16
Published online: 2017-09-29

Abstract

Introduction. Wide spectrum of alterations associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been reported. The current study aimed at evaluating the role of Hypoxis hemerocallidea (HH) aqueous extract on the testosterone levels, expression of androgen receptors and collagen fibers in the testes of streptozoto­cin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats under HAART regimen.

Material and methods. Sixty two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (189.0 ± 4.5 g) were divided into eight groups (8 animals in each treatment groups and 6 rats in the control group). Diabetes was induced by a single intraperi­toneal injection of nicotinamide (110 mg/kg bw) followed by streptozotocin (45 mg/kg bw) and the animals were then subjected to various treatments with HAART, HH extract or melatonin. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected to measure serum testosterone levels. Testes were fixed in buffered formaldehyde and paraffin processed. The expression of androgen receptor (AR) was assessed by immunohistochemistry and collagen fibers were visualized by Masson trichrome staining.

Results. Serum testosterone level was drastically (p < 0.0001) reduced in all rats with induced diabetes. In the testis of diabetic rats increased collagen fibers deposition with varying derangements in germinal epithelium of spermatogenic layers were observed. Intertubular hemorrhages and absence of spermatozoa were also noted in the testes of diabetic rats subjected to HAART. Reduced immunoexpression of ARs was found in the nuclei of Sertoli cells and the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes in III–IV stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle of diabetic animals treated with different dosages of HH alone and those treated with HAART concomitantly with melatonin and HH. The expression of ARs was almost negative in the testes of rats treated with HAART alone.

Conclusions. Concomitant treatment of rats with aqueous HH extract during the HAART did not change se­rum testosterone level nor mitigate the altered expression of collagen fibers and androgen receptor resulting from STZ-nicotinamide-induced diabetes. Therefore, anti-diabetic properties of Hypoxis extract require further investigation.

Abstract

Introduction. Wide spectrum of alterations associated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has been reported. The current study aimed at evaluating the role of Hypoxis hemerocallidea (HH) aqueous extract on the testosterone levels, expression of androgen receptors and collagen fibers in the testes of streptozoto­cin-nicotinamide-induced diabetic rats under HAART regimen.

Material and methods. Sixty two adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (189.0 ± 4.5 g) were divided into eight groups (8 animals in each treatment groups and 6 rats in the control group). Diabetes was induced by a single intraperi­toneal injection of nicotinamide (110 mg/kg bw) followed by streptozotocin (45 mg/kg bw) and the animals were then subjected to various treatments with HAART, HH extract or melatonin. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were collected to measure serum testosterone levels. Testes were fixed in buffered formaldehyde and paraffin processed. The expression of androgen receptor (AR) was assessed by immunohistochemistry and collagen fibers were visualized by Masson trichrome staining.

Results. Serum testosterone level was drastically (p < 0.0001) reduced in all rats with induced diabetes. In the testis of diabetic rats increased collagen fibers deposition with varying derangements in germinal epithelium of spermatogenic layers were observed. Intertubular hemorrhages and absence of spermatozoa were also noted in the testes of diabetic rats subjected to HAART. Reduced immunoexpression of ARs was found in the nuclei of Sertoli cells and the cytoplasm of spermatogonia and spermatocytes in III–IV stages of the seminiferous epithelium cycle of diabetic animals treated with different dosages of HH alone and those treated with HAART concomitantly with melatonin and HH. The expression of ARs was almost negative in the testes of rats treated with HAART alone.

Conclusions. Concomitant treatment of rats with aqueous HH extract during the HAART did not change se­rum testosterone level nor mitigate the altered expression of collagen fibers and androgen receptor resulting from STZ-nicotinamide-induced diabetes. Therefore, anti-diabetic properties of Hypoxis extract require further investigation.

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Keywords

HAART; testis; diabetes; androgen receptors; collagen fibers; Hypoxis hemerocallidea; rat

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Title

Impaired expression of testicular androgen receptor and collagen fibers in the testis of diabetic rats under HAART: the role of Hypoxis hemerocallidea

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

149-158

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2017.0016

Pubmed

28994096

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):149-158.

Keywords

HAART
testis
diabetes
androgen receptors
collagen fibers
Hypoxis hemerocallidea
rat

Authors

Onanuga O. Ismail
Jegede A. Isaac
Offor Ugochukwu
Ogedengbe O. Oluwatosin
Peter I. Aniekan
Naidu C.S. Edwin
Azu O. Onyemaechi

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