open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
Review paper
Submitted: 2016-12-28
Accepted: 2017-09-18
Published online: 2017-09-29
Get Citation

Circulating tumor cells in urological cancers

Martin Cegan1, Christopher Kobierzycki2, Katarina Kolostova3, Imrich Kiss3, Vladimir Bobek324, Robert Grill5
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2017.0015
·
Pubmed: 28994093
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):107-113.
Affiliations
  1. Department of Pathology and Department of Thoracic Surgery, Masaryk’s Hospital in Usti nad Labem, Usti nad Labem, Czech Republic
  2. Department of Histology and Embryology, Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Poland
  3. Department of Laboratory Genetics, University Hospital Kralovske Vinohrady, Prague, Czech Republic
  4. 3rd Department of Surgery, Motol University Hospital and 1st Faculty of Medicine, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic
  5. Department of Urology, University Hospital Kralovske Vinohrady, Prague, Czech Republic

open access

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)
REVIEW
Submitted: 2016-12-28
Accepted: 2017-09-18
Published online: 2017-09-29

Abstract

Circulating tumor cells (CTC) represent a very small subpopulation of the cancer cells found in the bloodstream of patients in the metastatic phase of neoplastic disease. Due to the timeline of the disease, they are regarded as a negative prognostic marker. This study focused on determining CTC percentages; these values vary be­tween different types of cancer. In addition to their diagnostic use, CTCs may also be used to treat the disease. Calculating CTC population size and analyzing their biology in patients in advanced stages of cancer may prove valuable in creating a molecular profile for the disease. This would strongly encourage diagnostics and enable personalized treatment. We here present an analysis of recent data on CTCs in urological cancers and their potential uses.

Abstract

Circulating tumor cells (CTC) represent a very small subpopulation of the cancer cells found in the bloodstream of patients in the metastatic phase of neoplastic disease. Due to the timeline of the disease, they are regarded as a negative prognostic marker. This study focused on determining CTC percentages; these values vary be­tween different types of cancer. In addition to their diagnostic use, CTCs may also be used to treat the disease. Calculating CTC population size and analyzing their biology in patients in advanced stages of cancer may prove valuable in creating a molecular profile for the disease. This would strongly encourage diagnostics and enable personalized treatment. We here present an analysis of recent data on CTCs in urological cancers and their potential uses.

Get Citation

Keywords

CTCs; circulating tumor cells; prostate cancer; kidney cancer; bladder cancer; cultivation; in vitro; gene expression

About this article
Title

Circulating tumor cells in urological cancers

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 55, No 3 (2017)

Article type

Review paper

Pages

107-113

Published online

2017-09-29

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2017.0015

Pubmed

28994093

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(3):107-113.

Keywords

CTCs
circulating tumor cells
prostate cancer
kidney cancer
bladder cancer
cultivation
in vitro
gene expression

Authors

Martin Cegan
Christopher Kobierzycki
Katarina Kolostova
Imrich Kiss
Vladimir Bobek
Robert Grill

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