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Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
Original paper
Submitted: 2016-11-16
Accepted: 2018-07-24
Published online: 2018-07-31
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Study of the hydromineral regulation of Typhlonectes compressicauda according to the seasonal variation

Mohammad Yousef1, Elara N. Moudilou1, Hafsa Djoudad-Kadji2, Jean-Marie Exbrayat1
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2018.0016
·
Pubmed: 30070682
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):172-183.
Affiliations
  1. University of Lyon, UMRS 449, Laboratory of General Biology, Lyon Catholic University; Laboratory of Reproduction and Comparative Development, Lyon, France
  2. Laboratoire de Zoologie Appliquée et d’Ecophysiologie Animale, Faculté des Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Université de Bejaia, Algérie

open access

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2016-11-16
Accepted: 2018-07-24
Published online: 2018-07-31

Abstract

Introduction. Typhlonectes compressicauda is a viviparous gymnophionan amphibian living in tropical areas of South America. This lengthened amphibian is submitted to seasonal variations characterized by the rainy season (from January to June) and the dry season (from July to December). The mineral homeostasis in amphibians is partly ensured by the neurohormones arginine-vasotocin (AVT), and mesotocin (MST). These two hormones were localized in the hypothalamus, and their receptors, mesotocin receptors (MTR) and vasotocin receptors (VTR2) in the kidney. The aim of the study was to better understand the physiology of the hydromineral regulation of the studied species.

Material and methods. The specimens of T. compressicauda male and female adult were divided into 6 groups: males in the rainy season, males in the dry season, females pregnant in the rainy season, females pregnant in the dry season, females not pregnant in the rainy season, females not pregnant in the dry season. We studied the expression of hormones (AVT, MST) and their receptors (MTR, VTR2) in the hypothalamus and the kidney, respectively, by immunohistochemical and histological techniques. We also studied the expression of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a water-channel protein in the kidney.

Results. We found that the MST (diuretic hormone) and its receptor were more intensively expressed during the rainy season, whereas the period of maximal AVT (anti-diuretic hormone) and VTR2 expression was the dry season. A quantitative analysis showed significant differences in the number of labeled cells in the hypothalamus depending on the seasonal variation. The expression of AQP2 was observed in renal tubules during both seasons with an increased intensity during the dry season.

Conclusion. The expression of the MST/AVT in brain, their receptors MTRs/VTR2, and AQP2 in kidney changed in T. compressicauda according to the seasonal variations. A direct relationship between the seasonal cycle and reproduction cycle was demonstrated in this species.

Abstract

Introduction. Typhlonectes compressicauda is a viviparous gymnophionan amphibian living in tropical areas of South America. This lengthened amphibian is submitted to seasonal variations characterized by the rainy season (from January to June) and the dry season (from July to December). The mineral homeostasis in amphibians is partly ensured by the neurohormones arginine-vasotocin (AVT), and mesotocin (MST). These two hormones were localized in the hypothalamus, and their receptors, mesotocin receptors (MTR) and vasotocin receptors (VTR2) in the kidney. The aim of the study was to better understand the physiology of the hydromineral regulation of the studied species.

Material and methods. The specimens of T. compressicauda male and female adult were divided into 6 groups: males in the rainy season, males in the dry season, females pregnant in the rainy season, females pregnant in the dry season, females not pregnant in the rainy season, females not pregnant in the dry season. We studied the expression of hormones (AVT, MST) and their receptors (MTR, VTR2) in the hypothalamus and the kidney, respectively, by immunohistochemical and histological techniques. We also studied the expression of aquaporin-2 (AQP2), a water-channel protein in the kidney.

Results. We found that the MST (diuretic hormone) and its receptor were more intensively expressed during the rainy season, whereas the period of maximal AVT (anti-diuretic hormone) and VTR2 expression was the dry season. A quantitative analysis showed significant differences in the number of labeled cells in the hypothalamus depending on the seasonal variation. The expression of AQP2 was observed in renal tubules during both seasons with an increased intensity during the dry season.

Conclusion. The expression of the MST/AVT in brain, their receptors MTRs/VTR2, and AQP2 in kidney changed in T. compressicauda according to the seasonal variations. A direct relationship between the seasonal cycle and reproduction cycle was demonstrated in this species.

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Keywords

Amphibian, gymnophiona; Typhlonectes compressicauda; mesotocin; vasotocin; vasotocin receptors; aquaporin; IHC

About this article
Title

Study of the hydromineral regulation of Typhlonectes compressicauda according to the seasonal variation

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 56, No 3 (2018)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

172-183

Published online

2018-07-31

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2018.0016

Pubmed

30070682

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2018;56(3):172-183.

Keywords

Amphibian
gymnophiona
Typhlonectes compressicauda
mesotocin
vasotocin
vasotocin receptors
aquaporin
IHC

Authors

Mohammad Yousef
Elara N. Moudilou
Hafsa Djoudad-Kadji
Jean-Marie Exbrayat

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