open access

Vol 55, No 2 (2017)
Original paper
Submitted: 2016-05-12
Accepted: 2017-06-13
Published online: 2017-06-20
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The role of homocysteine in seminal vesicles remodeling in rat

Adel Ghoul1, Elara Moudilou, Mohamed El Hadi Cherifi, Fouzia Zerrouk, Billel Chaouad, Anissa Moulahoum, Souhila Aouichat-Bouguerra, Khira Othmani, Jean-Marie Exbrayat, Yasmina Benazzoug
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2017.0010
·
Pubmed: 28636071
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(2):62-73.
Affiliations
  1. Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biology (BCM), Extracellular Matrix, Faculty of Biological Sciences (FSB), USTHB, El Alia, Algiers, Algeria, Algeria

open access

Vol 55, No 2 (2017)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2016-05-12
Accepted: 2017-06-13
Published online: 2017-06-20

Abstract

Introduction. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been associated with several tissue injuries including heart and liver fibrosis. In these diseases, hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) plays a major role in modulating the alteration of the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), leading to the pathological accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Since the effect of Hhcy on ECM of seminal vesicle was not studied, the aim of our research was to check if Hcy can induce a remodeling within seminal vesicles ECM.

Material and methods. The study was conducted in 22 adult male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into two groups: a control group, which received standard diet and tap water; the treated group received the same diet and water supplemented with solution of L-methionine (200 mg/kg b.w./day) for 6 months. Plasma homocysteine concentration was measured. Histological changes were observed with light microscope. The presence of collagen I and III and metalloproteinases (2, 3, 7 and 9) in the seminal vesicles was examined using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.

Results. Plasma Hcy levels increased significantly after methionine treatment and interfered significantly with body weight in treated rats. The content of fibrillar collagens (I and III) in the wall of seminal vesicles was elevated in hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Moreover, we found that hyperhomocysteinemia increased the expression of MMP-2, -3, -7 and -9 in seminal vesicles of experimental rats.

Conclusions. Increased plasma concentration of Hcy accompanied by the accumulation of collagen and upregulation of MMPs in rat seminal vesicles might contribute to the remodeling of seminal vesicles.  

Abstract

Introduction. Elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels have been associated with several tissue injuries including heart and liver fibrosis. In these diseases, hyperhomocysteinemia (Hhcy) plays a major role in modulating the alteration of the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), leading to the pathological accumulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Since the effect of Hhcy on ECM of seminal vesicle was not studied, the aim of our research was to check if Hcy can induce a remodeling within seminal vesicles ECM.

Material and methods. The study was conducted in 22 adult male Wistar rats. The rats were divided into two groups: a control group, which received standard diet and tap water; the treated group received the same diet and water supplemented with solution of L-methionine (200 mg/kg b.w./day) for 6 months. Plasma homocysteine concentration was measured. Histological changes were observed with light microscope. The presence of collagen I and III and metalloproteinases (2, 3, 7 and 9) in the seminal vesicles was examined using immunohistochemistry and Western blotting.

Results. Plasma Hcy levels increased significantly after methionine treatment and interfered significantly with body weight in treated rats. The content of fibrillar collagens (I and III) in the wall of seminal vesicles was elevated in hyperhomocysteinemic rats. Moreover, we found that hyperhomocysteinemia increased the expression of MMP-2, -3, -7 and -9 in seminal vesicles of experimental rats.

Conclusions. Increased plasma concentration of Hcy accompanied by the accumulation of collagen and upregulation of MMPs in rat seminal vesicles might contribute to the remodeling of seminal vesicles.  

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Keywords

hyperhomocysteinemia; rat; seminal vesicles; metalloproteinases; collagen I; collagen III; IHC; Western blot

About this article
Title

The role of homocysteine in seminal vesicles remodeling in rat

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 55, No 2 (2017)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

62-73

Published online

2017-06-20

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2017.0010

Pubmed

28636071

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2017;55(2):62-73.

Keywords

hyperhomocysteinemia
rat
seminal vesicles
metalloproteinases
collagen I
collagen III
IHC
Western blot

Authors

Adel Ghoul
Elara Moudilou
Mohamed El Hadi Cherifi
Fouzia Zerrouk
Billel Chaouad
Anissa Moulahoum
Souhila Aouichat-Bouguerra
Khira Othmani
Jean-Marie Exbrayat
Yasmina Benazzoug

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