open access

Vol 54, No 4 (2016)
Original paper
Submitted: 2016-05-10
Accepted: 2016-11-23
Published online: 2016-12-02
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Ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of hypertensive rats

Izabela Janiuk, Jerzy Kaleczyc, Irena Kasacka
DOI: 10.5603/FHC.a2016.0023
·
Pubmed: 27966210
·
Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2016;54(4):181-185.

open access

Vol 54, No 4 (2016)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Submitted: 2016-05-10
Accepted: 2016-11-23
Published online: 2016-12-02

Abstract

Introduction. Ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted by the endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, has recently been shown to affect the function of the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to assess the number and morphology of ghrelin-immunopositive (GhrIP) cells in the gastrointestinal tract of rats at different developmental phases of experimentally evoked renovascular hypertension.

Material and methods. The study involved 40 rats divided into two groups: control (C; n = 20) and rats with experimentally induced hypertension (EH; n = 20). The Goldblatt model of two-kidneys, one clip (2K1C) was used to induce hypertension. Renovascular hypertension was maintained for either 3 (EH1 group; n = 10) or 42 (EH2 group; n = 10) days. Paraffin sections from the cardia, corpus and pylorus of the stomach, as well as from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were processed for peroxidase immunohistochemistry.

Results. The number of GhrIP cells was significantly higher in the cardia and corpus of the stomach as well as the duodenum and jejunum of hypertensive rats compared to that found in the control animals.

Conclusions. The increased number of GhrIP cells in the rat gastrointestinal tract after partial unilateral ligation of the renal artery suggests that renovascular hypertension may affect ghrelin secretion, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications.

Abstract

Introduction. Ghrelin, an appetite-stimulating hormone secreted by the endocrine cells of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, has recently been shown to affect the function of the cardiovascular system. This study aimed to assess the number and morphology of ghrelin-immunopositive (GhrIP) cells in the gastrointestinal tract of rats at different developmental phases of experimentally evoked renovascular hypertension.

Material and methods. The study involved 40 rats divided into two groups: control (C; n = 20) and rats with experimentally induced hypertension (EH; n = 20). The Goldblatt model of two-kidneys, one clip (2K1C) was used to induce hypertension. Renovascular hypertension was maintained for either 3 (EH1 group; n = 10) or 42 (EH2 group; n = 10) days. Paraffin sections from the cardia, corpus and pylorus of the stomach, as well as from the duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon were processed for peroxidase immunohistochemistry.

Results. The number of GhrIP cells was significantly higher in the cardia and corpus of the stomach as well as the duodenum and jejunum of hypertensive rats compared to that found in the control animals.

Conclusions. The increased number of GhrIP cells in the rat gastrointestinal tract after partial unilateral ligation of the renal artery suggests that renovascular hypertension may affect ghrelin secretion, which can contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications.

Get Citation

Keywords

hypertensive rat; gastrointestinal (GI) tract; ghrelin; immunohistochemistry

About this article
Title

Ghrelin-immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of hypertensive rats

Journal

Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica

Issue

Vol 54, No 4 (2016)

Article type

Original paper

Pages

181-185

Published online

2016-12-02

DOI

10.5603/FHC.a2016.0023

Pubmed

27966210

Bibliographic record

Folia Histochem Cytobiol 2016;54(4):181-185.

Keywords

hypertensive rat
gastrointestinal (GI) tract
ghrelin
immunohistochemistry

Authors

Izabela Janiuk
Jerzy Kaleczyc
Irena Kasacka

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