open access

Vol 70, No 5 (2019)
Review Article
Published online: 2019-10-25
Submitted: 2019-04-30
Accepted: 2019-06-30
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Magnetic resonance imaging and symptoms in patients with neurosarcoidosis and central diabetes insipidus

Eiichi Kakehi, Seiji Adachi, Yusuke Fukuyasu, Yasuhiro Hashimoto, Shigehisa Sakurai, Akane Hirotani, Hisanori Danbara, Kaduyo Shimizu, Ryosuke Fujita, Hiroyuki Teraura, Kazuhiko Kotani, Masami Matsumura
DOI: 10.5603/EP.a2019.0035
·
Pubmed: 31681969
·
Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(5):430-437.

open access

Vol 70, No 5 (2019)
Review Article
Published online: 2019-10-25
Submitted: 2019-04-30
Accepted: 2019-06-30

Abstract

Introduction: In the clinical setting, the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis in patients with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is typically based both on symptoms (i.e. polydipsia or polyuria) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (e.g. pituitary abnormality). However, inconsistent changes in the patient’s symptoms and brain MRI findings may occur during the clinical course of the disease. This review was performed to summarise the relationship between symptoms and brain MRI findings in previously reported cases of neurosarcoidosis with CDI.

Material and methods: Case studies of patients diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis with CDI were collected via a PubMed search of studies published through 30 June 2018.

Results: Thirteen eligible studies were reviewed (20 patients; 12 men, 8 women; mean age 33 years). Polydipsia or polyuria was the first symptom in 13 patients. The mean duration from disease onset to diagnosis was 3.4 months. Brain MRIs showed abnormal findings in the hypothalamus and pituitary for 17 patients. Immunosuppressive drugs were used in 17 patients. For 14 patients, MRI findings improved, while symptoms did not.

Conclusion: Patients with both neurosarcoidosis and CDI symptoms often do not improve, despite the fact that brain MRI findings often improve following treatment. More studies involving detailed pathological analyses and longer follow-up periods are necessary.

Abstract

Introduction: In the clinical setting, the diagnosis of neurosarcoidosis in patients with central diabetes insipidus (CDI) is typically based both on symptoms (i.e. polydipsia or polyuria) and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings (e.g. pituitary abnormality). However, inconsistent changes in the patient’s symptoms and brain MRI findings may occur during the clinical course of the disease. This review was performed to summarise the relationship between symptoms and brain MRI findings in previously reported cases of neurosarcoidosis with CDI.

Material and methods: Case studies of patients diagnosed with neurosarcoidosis with CDI were collected via a PubMed search of studies published through 30 June 2018.

Results: Thirteen eligible studies were reviewed (20 patients; 12 men, 8 women; mean age 33 years). Polydipsia or polyuria was the first symptom in 13 patients. The mean duration from disease onset to diagnosis was 3.4 months. Brain MRIs showed abnormal findings in the hypothalamus and pituitary for 17 patients. Immunosuppressive drugs were used in 17 patients. For 14 patients, MRI findings improved, while symptoms did not.

Conclusion: Patients with both neurosarcoidosis and CDI symptoms often do not improve, despite the fact that brain MRI findings often improve following treatment. More studies involving detailed pathological analyses and longer follow-up periods are necessary.

Get Citation

Keywords

neurosarcoidosis; central diabetes insipidus; pituitary; pituitary stalk; prednisolone

About this article
Title

Magnetic resonance imaging and symptoms in patients with neurosarcoidosis and central diabetes insipidus

Journal

Endokrynologia Polska

Issue

Vol 70, No 5 (2019)

Pages

430-437

Published online

2019-10-25

DOI

10.5603/EP.a2019.0035

Pubmed

31681969

Bibliographic record

Endokrynologia Polska 2019;70(5):430-437.

Keywords

neurosarcoidosis
central diabetes insipidus
pituitary
pituitary stalk
prednisolone

Authors

Eiichi Kakehi
Seiji Adachi
Yusuke Fukuyasu
Yasuhiro Hashimoto
Shigehisa Sakurai
Akane Hirotani
Hisanori Danbara
Kaduyo Shimizu
Ryosuke Fujita
Hiroyuki Teraura
Kazuhiko Kotani
Masami Matsumura

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