open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31
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The place of TrueCPR feedback device in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Should we use it? A randomized pilot study

Jolanta Majer, Agnieszka Madziala, Agata Dabrowska, Marek Dabrowski
DOI: 10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0028
·
Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):131-136.

open access

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Published online: 2018-12-31

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Sudden cardiac arrest is a challenge for medical personnel as well as a high socio-economic burden. Many authors indicate that the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including chest compres- sions performed without an assisted device, may raise doubts due to failure to achieve the value of chest compressions recommended by the guidelines of the American Cardiac Society. All kinds of devices support- ing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including CPR feedback devices, may be helpful in this regard. 

METHODS: The study involved 38 nurses who were tasked with conducting a 2-minute cardiopulmonary resuscitation cycle based on continuous chest compression. chest compressions were carried out in two sce- narios: with and without the use of a TrueCPR feedback device. Both the order of the participants as well as the research methods were random. For this purpose, the coin-toss technique was used. Statistical analysis was conducted using the Statistica 12EN system. 

RESULTS: The average chest compression rate in the case of non-instrumental compression was 131 ± 12 com- pressions per minute and was statistically significantly higher than in the case of using the TrueCPR device (P = 0.022). Mean chest compression depth with and without the TrueCPR device showed significant variation, 38 ± 11 mm for manual chest compression, and 52 ± 6 mm for TrueCPR (P < 0.001). Full chest recoil for manual chest compression and compression using the TrueCPR device was 46 ± 19%, respectively. 75 ± 18% (P < 0.001). 

CONCLUSIONS: The use of the TrueCPR device in simulated resuscitation conditions has a statistically signif- icant effect on the improvement of chest compression parameters, including the frequency and depth of chest compressions as well as the degree of correctness of chest relaxation. 

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Sudden cardiac arrest is a challenge for medical personnel as well as a high socio-economic burden. Many authors indicate that the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including chest compres- sions performed without an assisted device, may raise doubts due to failure to achieve the value of chest compressions recommended by the guidelines of the American Cardiac Society. All kinds of devices support- ing cardiopulmonary resuscitation, including CPR feedback devices, may be helpful in this regard. 

METHODS: The study involved 38 nurses who were tasked with conducting a 2-minute cardiopulmonary resuscitation cycle based on continuous chest compression. chest compressions were carried out in two sce- narios: with and without the use of a TrueCPR feedback device. Both the order of the participants as well as the research methods were random. For this purpose, the coin-toss technique was used. Statistical analysis was conducted using the Statistica 12EN system. 

RESULTS: The average chest compression rate in the case of non-instrumental compression was 131 ± 12 com- pressions per minute and was statistically significantly higher than in the case of using the TrueCPR device (P = 0.022). Mean chest compression depth with and without the TrueCPR device showed significant variation, 38 ± 11 mm for manual chest compression, and 52 ± 6 mm for TrueCPR (P < 0.001). Full chest recoil for manual chest compression and compression using the TrueCPR device was 46 ± 19%, respectively. 75 ± 18% (P < 0.001). 

CONCLUSIONS: The use of the TrueCPR device in simulated resuscitation conditions has a statistically signif- icant effect on the improvement of chest compression parameters, including the frequency and depth of chest compressions as well as the degree of correctness of chest relaxation. 

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Keywords

cardiopulmonary resuscitation; chest compression; quality; nurse; medical simulation

About this article
Title

The place of TrueCPR feedback device in cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Should we use it? A randomized pilot study

Journal

Disaster and Emergency Medicine Journal

Issue

Vol 3, No 4 (2018)

Pages

131-136

Published online

2018-12-31

DOI

10.5603/DEMJ.2018.0028

Bibliographic record

Disaster Emerg Med J 2018;3(4):131-136.

Keywords

cardiopulmonary resuscitation
chest compression
quality
nurse
medical simulation

Authors

Jolanta Majer
Agnieszka Madziala
Agata Dabrowska
Marek Dabrowski

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