open access

Vol 10, No 4 (2021)
Research paper
Published online: 2021-09-09
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Metabolic syndrome and its associated factors in Shiraz Heart Study (A cohort-based cross-sectional study)

Mehrab Sayadi, Mohammad Javad Zibaeenezhad, Fatemeh Khademian, Amirali Mashhadiagha, Nasrin Motazedian
DOI: 10.5603/DK.a2021.0044
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Clinical Diabetology 2021;10(4):330-336.

open access

Vol 10, No 4 (2021)
Original articles (submitted)
Published online: 2021-09-09

Abstract

Background and Aims: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors is an increasing global concern. It predisposes individuals to a significant cardiovascular risk that is the leading cause of death in Iran. We investigated MetS prevalence and its risk factors in Shiraz, Iran. Methods: 7225 participants in the age range of 40 to 70 years were recruited from the Shiraz Heart Cohort Study. MetS was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III definition. The trend test, univariate, and multiple logistic regression were performed via SPSS version 16 at 0.05 significance level. Results: Among the cases, 3780 (52.3 %) were female, and more than 73.4 % were overweight or obese. MetS prevalence in Shiraz is estimated around 45.5 % (95% CI: 44.4 - 46.7%), and female odds were 1.91 times more than males. Participants with low physical activity had nearly twice the risk of metabolic syndrome in comparison to individuals with high physical activity. The univariate logistic regression showed that age, gender, job, education, marital status, and physical activity are significantly associated with MetS. Conclusions: The prevalence of MetS in the Shiraz urban population is relatively high and has become more common amongst middle-aged people, which can significantly endanger public health. Since most of the risk factors are modifiable, it is imperative to set policies in order to control MetS and its associated risk factors.

Abstract

Background and Aims: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) with modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors is an increasing global concern. It predisposes individuals to a significant cardiovascular risk that is the leading cause of death in Iran. We investigated MetS prevalence and its risk factors in Shiraz, Iran. Methods: 7225 participants in the age range of 40 to 70 years were recruited from the Shiraz Heart Cohort Study. MetS was diagnosed according to the Adult Treatment Panel III definition. The trend test, univariate, and multiple logistic regression were performed via SPSS version 16 at 0.05 significance level. Results: Among the cases, 3780 (52.3 %) were female, and more than 73.4 % were overweight or obese. MetS prevalence in Shiraz is estimated around 45.5 % (95% CI: 44.4 - 46.7%), and female odds were 1.91 times more than males. Participants with low physical activity had nearly twice the risk of metabolic syndrome in comparison to individuals with high physical activity. The univariate logistic regression showed that age, gender, job, education, marital status, and physical activity are significantly associated with MetS. Conclusions: The prevalence of MetS in the Shiraz urban population is relatively high and has become more common amongst middle-aged people, which can significantly endanger public health. Since most of the risk factors are modifiable, it is imperative to set policies in order to control MetS and its associated risk factors.

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Keywords

Metabolic syndrome, Physical activity, Urban population

About this article
Title

Metabolic syndrome and its associated factors in Shiraz Heart Study (A cohort-based cross-sectional study)

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 10, No 4 (2021)

Article type

Research paper

Pages

330-336

Published online

2021-09-09

DOI

10.5603/DK.a2021.0044

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2021;10(4):330-336.

Keywords

Metabolic syndrome
Physical activity
Urban population

Authors

Mehrab Sayadi
Mohammad Javad Zibaeenezhad
Fatemeh Khademian
Amirali Mashhadiagha
Nasrin Motazedian

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