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Vol 2, No 1 (2001): Practical Diabetology
Original articles (translated)
Published online: 2000-11-03
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Asymptomatic bacteriuria may be considered a complication in women with diabetes

Suzanne E. Geerlings, Ronald P. Stolk, Marielle J.L. Camps, Paetrick M. Netten, Joost B.L. Hoekstra, K. Paul Bouter, Bert Bravenboer, J. Theo Collet, Arjen R. Jansz, Andy I.M. Hoepelman
Diabetologia Praktyczna 2001;2(1):45-52.

open access

Vol 2, No 1 (2001): Practical Diabetology
Original articles (translated)
Published online: 2000-11-03

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To study the prevalence of and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in women with and without diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS. A total of 636 nonpregnant women with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) who were 18–75 years of age and had no abnormalities of the urinary tract, and 153 women without diabetes who were visiting the eye and trauma outpatient clinic (control subjects) were included. We defined ASB as the presence of at least 105 colony-forming units/ml of 1 or 2 bacterial species in a culture of clean-voided midstream urine from an individual without symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI).
RESULTS. The prevalence of ASB was 26% in the diabetic women and 6% in the control subjects (P < 0.001). The prevalence of ASB in women with type 1 diabetes was 21%. Risk factors for ASB in type 1 diabetic women included a longer duration of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and macroalbuminuria. The prevalence of ASB was 29% in women with type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for ASB in type 2 diabetic women included age, macroalbuminuria, a lower BMI, and a UTI during the previous year. No association was evident between current HbA1c level and the presence of ASB.
CONCLUSIONS. The prevalence of ASB is increased in women with diabetes and might be added to the list of diabetic complications in these women.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE. To study the prevalence of and risk factors for asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) in women with and without diabetes.
RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS. A total of 636 nonpregnant women with diabetes (type 1 and type 2) who were 18–75 years of age and had no abnormalities of the urinary tract, and 153 women without diabetes who were visiting the eye and trauma outpatient clinic (control subjects) were included. We defined ASB as the presence of at least 105 colony-forming units/ml of 1 or 2 bacterial species in a culture of clean-voided midstream urine from an individual without symptoms of a urinary tract infection (UTI).
RESULTS. The prevalence of ASB was 26% in the diabetic women and 6% in the control subjects (P < 0.001). The prevalence of ASB in women with type 1 diabetes was 21%. Risk factors for ASB in type 1 diabetic women included a longer duration of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and macroalbuminuria. The prevalence of ASB was 29% in women with type 2 diabetes. Risk factors for ASB in type 2 diabetic women included age, macroalbuminuria, a lower BMI, and a UTI during the previous year. No association was evident between current HbA1c level and the presence of ASB.
CONCLUSIONS. The prevalence of ASB is increased in women with diabetes and might be added to the list of diabetic complications in these women.
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About this article
Title

Asymptomatic bacteriuria may be considered a complication in women with diabetes

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 2, No 1 (2001): Practical Diabetology

Pages

45-52

Published online

2000-11-03

Bibliographic record

Diabetologia Praktyczna 2001;2(1):45-52.

Authors

Suzanne E. Geerlings
Ronald P. Stolk
Marielle J.L. Camps
Paetrick M. Netten
Joost B.L. Hoekstra
K. Paul Bouter
Bert Bravenboer
J. Theo Collet
Arjen R. Jansz
Andy I.M. Hoepelman

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