open access

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)
Other materials agreed with the Editors
Published online: 2020-11-17
Get Citation

COVID-19 in patients with gestational diabetes: review of literature

Mahdya Bukhari
DOI: 10.5603/DK.2020.0056
·
Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(6):367-371.

open access

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)
COVID-19 AND DIABETES
Published online: 2020-11-17

Abstract

The risk of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) to maternal and newborn health has yet to be determined. Several studies showed that pregnancy with gestational diabetes increased the risk of maternal illness, but cases of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia and preterm birth have been reported rarely. Reports indicated placental infection and vertical transmission of COVID-19 were uncommon. Interestingly, despite the lack of SARS-CoV-2 placental infection, there were many records of major abnormalities in placental morphology. Continued research into offsprings of pregnant women with gestational diabetes infected with SARS-CoV-2 was vitally necessary. This study showed the impact of COVID infections on the fetus and the newborn in GDM pregnancy. There were very few data considering this subject and therefore, the findings have nowadays very debatable value. However, it’s worthwhile to show the scientific community that nowadays we have no proof that COVID infection has a significant impact on pregnancy and the fetus.

Abstract

The risk of severe acute respiratory distress syndrome associated with coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) to maternal and newborn health has yet to be determined. Several studies showed that pregnancy with gestational diabetes increased the risk of maternal illness, but cases of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia and preterm birth have been reported rarely. Reports indicated placental infection and vertical transmission of COVID-19 were uncommon. Interestingly, despite the lack of SARS-CoV-2 placental infection, there were many records of major abnormalities in placental morphology. Continued research into offsprings of pregnant women with gestational diabetes infected with SARS-CoV-2 was vitally necessary. This study showed the impact of COVID infections on the fetus and the newborn in GDM pregnancy. There were very few data considering this subject and therefore, the findings have nowadays very debatable value. However, it’s worthwhile to show the scientific community that nowadays we have no proof that COVID infection has a significant impact on pregnancy and the fetus.

Get Citation

Keywords

COVID-19, patients, gestational diabetes

About this article
Title

COVID-19 in patients with gestational diabetes: review of literature

Journal

Clinical Diabetology

Issue

Vol 9, No 6 (2020)

Article type

Other materials agreed with the Editors

Pages

367-371

Published online

2020-11-17

DOI

10.5603/DK.2020.0056

Bibliographic record

Clinical Diabetology 2020;9(6):367-371.

Keywords

COVID-19
patients
gestational diabetes

Authors

Mahdya Bukhari

References (53)
  1. Mor G, Aldo P, Alvero AB. The unique immunological and microbial aspects of pregnancy. Nat Rev Immunol. 2017; 17(8): 469–482.
  2. Racicot K, Mor G. Risks associated with viral infections during pregnancyViral infections during pregnancy. J Clin Invest. 2017; 127: 1591–1599.
  3. Wong SF, Chow KM, Leung TN, et al. Pregnancy and perinatal outcomes of women with severe acute respiratory syndrome. Am J Obstet Gynecol . 2004; 191: 292–297.
  4. Hantoushzadeh S, Shamshirsaz AA, Aleyasin A, et al. Maternal death due to COVID-19. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020; 223(1): 109.e1–109.e16.
  5. Karami P, Naghavi M, Feyzi A, et al. WITHDRAWN: Mortality of a pregnant patient diagnosed with COVID-19: A case report with clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2020 [Epub ahead of print]: 101665.
  6. Algarroba GN, Rekawek P, Vahanian SA, et al. Visualization of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 invading the human placenta using electron microscopy. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020; 223(2): 275–278.
  7. Hosier HFS, Morotti R, Deshmukh U, et al. First case of placental infection with SARS‐CoV‐2. J Clin Investig. 2020; 130(9): 4947–4953.
  8. Patane L, Morotti D, Giunta MR, et al. Vertical transmission of coronavirus disease 2019: severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA on the fetal side of the placenta in pregnancies with coronavirus disease 2019–positive mothers and neonates at birth. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM. 2020; 2(3): 100145. .
  9. Alzamora MC, Paredes T, Caceres D, et al. Severe COVID-19 during Pregnancy and Possible Vertical Transmission. Am J Perinatol. 2020; 37(8): 861–865.
  10. Ashary N, Bhide A, Chakraborty P, et al. Single-Cell RNA-seq Identifies Cell Subsets in Human Placenta That Highly Expresses Factors Driving Pathogenesis of SARS-CoV-2. Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology. 2020; 8.
  11. Baergen RN, Heller DS. Placental Pathology in Covid-19 Positive Mothers: Preliminary Findings. Pediatr Dev Pathol. 2020; 23(3): 177–180.
  12. Baud D, Greub G, Favre G, et al. Second-Trimester Miscarriage in a Pregnant Woman With SARS-CoV-2 Infection. JAMA. 2020; 323(21): 2198–2200.
  13. Bestle D, Heindl M, Limburg H, et al. TMPRSS2 and furin are both essential for proteolytic activation and spread of SARS-CoV-2 in human airway epithelial cells and provide promising drug targets. .
  14. Breslin N, Baptiste C, Gyamfi‐Bannerman C G. COVID‐19 infection among asymptomatic and symptomatic pregnant women: Two weeks of confirmed presentations to an affiliated pair of New York City hospitals. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM 100118. 2020.
  15. Chen H, Guo J, Wang C, et al. Clinical characteristics and intrauterine vertical transmission potential of COVID-19 infection in nine pregnant women: a retrospective review of medical records. Lancet. 2020; 395(10226): 809–815.
  16. Chen L, Li Q, Zheng D, et al. Clinical Characteristics of Pregnant Women with Covid-19 in Wuhan, China. N Engl J Med. 2020; 382(25): e100.
  17. Delorme-Axford E, Donker RB, Mouillet JF, et al. Human placental trophoblasts confer viral resistance to recipient cells. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2013; 110(29): 12048–12053.
  18. Dong L, Tian J, He S, et al. Possible Vertical Transmission of SARS-CoV-2 From an Infected Mother to Her Newborn. JAMA. 2020; 323(18): 1846–1848.
  19. Fan C, Lei Di, Fang C, et al. Perinatal Transmission of COVID-19 Associated SARS-CoV-2: Should We Worry? Clin Infect Dis. 2020 [Epub ahead of print].
  20. Hirshberg A, Kern-Goldberger AR, Levine LD, et al. Care of critically ill pregnant patients with coronavirus disease 2019: a case series. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020; 223(2): 286–290.
  21. Hoffmann M, Kleine-Weber H, Schroeder S, et al. SARS-CoV-2 Cell Entry Depends on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and Is Blocked by a Clinically Proven Protease Inhibitor. Cell. 2020; 181(2): 271–280.e8.
  22. Honig A, Rieger L, Kapp M, et al. Immunohistochemistry in human placental tissue--pitfalls of antigen detection. J Histochem Cytochem. 2005; 53(11): 1413–1420.
  23. Kimberlin DW, Stagno S. Can SARS-CoV-2 Infection Be Acquired In Utero?: More Definitive Evidence Is Needed. JAMA. 2020; 323(18): 1788–1789.
  24. Kuba K, Imai Y, Rao S, et al. A crucial role of angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in SARS coronavirus-induced lung injury. Nat Med. 2005; 11(8): 875–879.
  25. Li M, Chen L, Zhang J, et al. The SARS-CoV-2 receptor ACE2 expression of maternal-fetal interface and fetal organs by single-cell transcriptome study. PLoS One. 2020; 15(4): e0230295.
  26. Li Y, Zhao R, Zheng S, et al. Lack of Vertical Transmission of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2, China. Emerg Infect Dis. 2020; 26(6): 1335–1336.
  27. Liu Y, Chen H, Tang K, et al. Clinical manifestations and outcome of SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. J Infect. 2020 [Epub ahead of print].
  28. Lokken E, Walker C, Delaney S, et al. Clinical characteristics of 46 pregnant women with a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection in Washington State. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2020.
  29. Mulvey JJ, Magro CM, Ma LX, et al. Analysis of complement deposition and viral RNA in placentas of COVID-19 patients. Ann Diagn Pathol. 2020; 46: 151530.
  30. Nie R, Wang Ss, Yang Q, et al. Clinical features and the maternal and neonatal outcomes of pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019. .
  31. Pereira L. Congenital Viral Infection: Traversing the Uterine-Placental Interface. Annu Rev Virol. 2018; 5(1): 273–299.
  32. Pierce-Williams RAM, Burd J, Felder L, et al. Clinical course of severe and critical coronavirus disease 2019 in hospitalized pregnancies: a United States cohort study. Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM. 2020; 2(3): 100134.
  33. Piersigilli F, Carkeek K, Hocq C, et al. COVID-19 in a 26-week preterm neonate. The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health. 2020; 4(6): 476–478.
  34. Pique‐Regi R RR, Tarca A, Luca F, Xu Y, Alazizi A, Leng Y, Hsu C, Gomez‐Lopez N. Does the human placenta express the canonical cell entry mediators for SARS‐CoV‐2? https://elifesciences.org/articles/58716.
  35. Pringle KG, Tadros MA, Callister RJ, et al. The expression and localization of the human placental prorenin/renin-angiotensin system throughout pregnancy: roles in trophoblast invasion and angiogenesis? Placenta. 2011; 32(12): 956–962.
  36. Schwartz DA. An Analysis of 38 Pregnant Women with COVID-19, Their Newborn Infants, and Maternal-Fetal Transmission of SARS-CoV-2: Maternal Coronavirus Infections and Pregnancy Outcomes. Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2020 [Epub ahead of print].
  37. Shanes ED, Mithal LB, Otero S, et al. Placental Pathology in COVID-19. Am J Clin Pathol. 2020; 154(1): 23–32.
  38. Sungnak W, Huang Ni, Bécavin C, et al. HCA Lung Biological Network. SARS-CoV-2 entry factors are highly expressed in nasal epithelial cells together with innate immune genes. Nat Med. 2020; 26(5): 681–687.
  39. Sutton D, Fuchs K, D'Alton M, et al. Universal Screening for SARS-CoV-2 in Women Admitted for Delivery. N Engl J Med. 2020; 382(22): 2163–2164.
  40. Valdés G, Corthorn J, Bharadwaj MS, et al. Utero-placental expression of angiotensin-(1-7) and ACE2 in the pregnant guinea-pig. Reprod Biol Endocrinol. 2013; 11: 5.
  41. Valdés G, Neves LAA, Anton L, et al. Distribution of angiotensin-(1-7) and ACE2 in human placentas of normal and pathological pregnancies. Placenta. 2006; 27(2-3): 200–207.
  42. Wang S, Guo L, Chen L, et al. A case report of neonatal 285 COVID‐19 infection in China. Clin Infect Dis. 2020; ciaa225.
  43. Wang W, Xu Y, Gao R, et al. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in Different Types of Clinical Specimens. JAMA. 2020; 323(18): 1843–1844.
  44. Wang X, Zhou Z, Zhang J, et al. A Case of 2019 Novel Coronavirus in a Pregnant Woman With Preterm Delivery. Clin Infect Dis. 2020; 71(15): 844–846.
  45. Yan J, Guo J, Fan C, et al. Coronavirus disease 2019 in pregnant women: a report based on 116 cases. Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2020; 223(1): 111.e1–111.e14.
  46. Yin M, Zhang L, Deng G, et al. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Infection During Pregnancy In China: A Retrospective Cohort Study. BioRxiv. 2020.
  47. Yockey LJ, Lucas C, Iwasaki A. Contributions of maternal and fetal antiviral immunity in congenital disease. Science. 2020; 368(6491): 608–612.
  48. Yu N, Li W, Kang Q, et al. Clinical features and obstetric and neonatal outcomes of pregnant patients with COVID-19 in Wuhan, China: a retrospective, single-centre, descriptive study. Lancet Infect Dis. 2020; 20(5): 559–564.
  49. Yu N, Li W, Kang Q, et al. No SARS-CoV-2 detected in amniotic fluid in mid-pregnancy. Lancet Infect Dis. 2020 [Epub ahead of print].
  50. Zambrano LI, Fuentes-Barahona IC, Bejarano-Torres DA, et al. A pregnant woman with COVID-19 in Central America. Travel Med Infect Dis. 2020; 36: 101639.
  51. Zeng H, Xu C, Fan J, et al. Antibodies in Infants Born to Mothers With COVID-19 Pneumonia. JAMA. 2020; 323(18): 1848–1849.
  52. Zeng L, Xia S, Yuan W, et al. Neonatal Early-Onset Infection With SARS-CoV-2 in 33 Neonates Born to Mothers With COVID-19 in Wuhan, China. JAMA Pediatr. 2020; 174(7): 722–725.
  53. Zhu H, Wang L, Fang C, et al. Clinical analysis of 10 neonates born to mothers with 2019-nCoV pneumonia. Transl Pediatr. 2020; 9(1): 51–60.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

 

Wydawcą serwisu jest  "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail:  viamedica@viamedica.pl