open access

Vol 7, No 1 (2005)
Published online: 2005-05-06
Get Citation

Crossectomy as a method of pulmonary embolism prevention. Could it be a hazardous treatment?

Andrzej Cencora, Maciej Chwała, Andrzej Kostka, Marek Piwowarczyk
Chirurgia Polska 2005;7(1):27-30.

open access

Vol 7, No 1 (2005)
Published online: 2005-05-06

Abstract

Background: Ascending saphenous phlebitis (ASPh) located in the proximal part of the long saphenous vein (LSV) may be a life-threatening condition. Crossectomy preventing propagation of the thrombus to the femoral vein is a valuable method in order to avoid pulmonary embolisation. The purpose of this study was to assess how often such a treatment, instead of preventing the danger of embolisation, may in fact create it.
Material and methods: 59 patients (22 men, 37 women), mean age 62 years (29–77) suffering from ASPh were analyzed. All Doppler duplex examinations were carried out by one investigator. In 4 cases, concomitant DVT of the same limb on crural level was found. A crossectomy was performed under local anaesthesia. If a thrombus was present in the deep veins (femoral, iliac), the patients were excluded from crossectomy.
Results: In 50 patients (85%) crossectomy was easy to perform because no thrombus was found in the most proximal part of LSV. An intraoperative evaluation revealed the presence of a thrombus at the sapheno-femoral junction in 9 cases (15%) but this had been recognized by previous doppler duplex in 5 cases (8%) only. In those patients, a thrombectomy at the saphenofemoral junction level and a crossectomy was defined as having a high risk of fragmentation during the procedure. A Fogarty catheter was routinely used. We did not notice any case of pulmonary embolisation perioperatvely.
Conclusion: A crossectomy in ascending saphenous phlebitis is hazardous in 15% of cases. A crossectomy is recommended as a safe and advisable method, in experienced hands of preventing pulmonary embolism.

Abstract

Background: Ascending saphenous phlebitis (ASPh) located in the proximal part of the long saphenous vein (LSV) may be a life-threatening condition. Crossectomy preventing propagation of the thrombus to the femoral vein is a valuable method in order to avoid pulmonary embolisation. The purpose of this study was to assess how often such a treatment, instead of preventing the danger of embolisation, may in fact create it.
Material and methods: 59 patients (22 men, 37 women), mean age 62 years (29–77) suffering from ASPh were analyzed. All Doppler duplex examinations were carried out by one investigator. In 4 cases, concomitant DVT of the same limb on crural level was found. A crossectomy was performed under local anaesthesia. If a thrombus was present in the deep veins (femoral, iliac), the patients were excluded from crossectomy.
Results: In 50 patients (85%) crossectomy was easy to perform because no thrombus was found in the most proximal part of LSV. An intraoperative evaluation revealed the presence of a thrombus at the sapheno-femoral junction in 9 cases (15%) but this had been recognized by previous doppler duplex in 5 cases (8%) only. In those patients, a thrombectomy at the saphenofemoral junction level and a crossectomy was defined as having a high risk of fragmentation during the procedure. A Fogarty catheter was routinely used. We did not notice any case of pulmonary embolisation perioperatvely.
Conclusion: A crossectomy in ascending saphenous phlebitis is hazardous in 15% of cases. A crossectomy is recommended as a safe and advisable method, in experienced hands of preventing pulmonary embolism.
Get Citation

Keywords

ascending saphenophlebitis; saphenofemoral junction; crossectomy; pulmonary embolisation

About this article
Title

Crossectomy as a method of pulmonary embolism prevention. Could it be a hazardous treatment?

Journal

Chirurgia Polska (Polish Surgery)

Issue

Vol 7, No 1 (2005)

Pages

27-30

Published online

2005-05-06

Bibliographic record

Chirurgia Polska 2005;7(1):27-30.

Keywords

ascending saphenophlebitis
saphenofemoral junction
crossectomy
pulmonary embolisation

Authors

Andrzej Cencora
Maciej Chwała
Andrzej Kostka
Marek Piwowarczyk

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

Via MedicaBy "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl