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Published online: 2021-06-09
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Clinical features of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in young Chinese patients

Yunjuan Sun, Jialiang Xu, Zhisong He, Xujie Cheng, Tingbo Jiang
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2021.0059

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2021-06-09

Abstract

Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics, angiographic findings and clinical outcomes (in-hospital) of young adults with acute myocardium infarction in a Chinese population.

Methods: This was an observational study. Five hundred and forty-nine patients who suffered with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) firstly between January 2013 and December 2015 were enrolled consecutively. All patients were divided into two groups: “young group” patients were ≤ 50 years old; and “non-young group” patients were > 50 years old. Clinical features were compared, angiographic findings and clinical outcomes were observed between the two groups.

Results: There were 131 and 418 patients included in the young group and the non-young group, respectively. Twenty-eight patients suffered deaths during the hospital stay and only one death occurred in the young group. Compared with non-young group, the young group was associated with male, smoke, fewer chronic diseases, Killip class I on admission, lower level of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), higher level of triglyceride and lower level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), single-vessel lesion and intracoronary thrombus (p < 0.005). The average length of hospital stay of non-young group was 1.5 days longer than the young group. Compared with the non-young group, the young group inclined not to use or use only one stent (p = 0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that older age, shorter hospital stay, advanced Killip class III/IV, increased white blood cell and NT-proBNP were independent risk factors for survival in acute STEMI patients during hospitalization (p < 0.005).

Conclusions: Compared with non-young group, the young group was associated with male, smoke, higher level of triglyceride and lower level of HDL-C. The condition of patients in young group were relatively mild and the risk of death during hospitalization was lower than the other group.

Abstract

Background: To investigate the clinical characteristics, angiographic findings and clinical outcomes (in-hospital) of young adults with acute myocardium infarction in a Chinese population.

Methods: This was an observational study. Five hundred and forty-nine patients who suffered with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) firstly between January 2013 and December 2015 were enrolled consecutively. All patients were divided into two groups: “young group” patients were ≤ 50 years old; and “non-young group” patients were > 50 years old. Clinical features were compared, angiographic findings and clinical outcomes were observed between the two groups.

Results: There were 131 and 418 patients included in the young group and the non-young group, respectively. Twenty-eight patients suffered deaths during the hospital stay and only one death occurred in the young group. Compared with non-young group, the young group was associated with male, smoke, fewer chronic diseases, Killip class I on admission, lower level of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), higher level of triglyceride and lower level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), single-vessel lesion and intracoronary thrombus (p < 0.005). The average length of hospital stay of non-young group was 1.5 days longer than the young group. Compared with the non-young group, the young group inclined not to use or use only one stent (p = 0.026). Multivariable logistic regression analysis showed that older age, shorter hospital stay, advanced Killip class III/IV, increased white blood cell and NT-proBNP were independent risk factors for survival in acute STEMI patients during hospitalization (p < 0.005).

Conclusions: Compared with non-young group, the young group was associated with male, smoke, higher level of triglyceride and lower level of HDL-C. The condition of patients in young group were relatively mild and the risk of death during hospitalization was lower than the other group.

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Keywords

ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), young, clinical feature, Chinese

About this article
Title

Clinical features of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction in young Chinese patients

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2021-06-09

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2021.0059

Keywords

ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI)
young
clinical feature
Chinese

Authors

Yunjuan Sun
Jialiang Xu
Zhisong He
Xujie Cheng
Tingbo Jiang

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