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Published online: 2021-08-17
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Cardiac exercise imaging using a 3-tesla magnetic resonance-conditional pedal ergometer: Preliminary results in healthy volunteers and patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

Agnes Mayr, Gert Klug, Sebastian J. Reinstadler, Regina Esterhammer, Christian Kremser, Klemens Mairer, Bernhard Metzler, Michael F. Schocke
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2021.0095
·
Pubmed: 34490601

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2021-08-17

Abstract

Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) remains underutilized as an exercise imaging modality, mostly because of the limited availability of MR-compatible exercise equipment. This study prospectively evaluates the clinical feasibility of a newly developed MR-conditional pedal ergometer for exercise CMR

Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (mean age 44 ± 16 years) and 11 patients (mean age 60 ± 9 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent rest and post-exercise cinematic 3T CMR. Visual analysis of wall motion abnormalities (WMA) was rated by 2 experienced radiologists, and volumes and ejection fractions (EF) were determined. Image quality was assessed by a 4-point Likert scale for visibility of endocardial borders. 

Results: Median subjective image quality of real-time Cine at rest was 1 (IQR 1–2) and 2 (IQR 2–2.5) for post-exercise real-time Cine (p = 0.001). Exercise induced a significant increase in heart rate (62 [62–73] to 111 [104–143] bpm, p < 0.0001). Stroke volume and cardiac index increased from resting to post-exercise conditions (85 ± 21 to 101 ± 19 mL and 2.9 ± 0.7 to 6.6 ± 1.9 L/min/m2, respectively; both p < 0.0001), driven by a reduction in end-systolic volume (55 ± 20 to 42 ± 21 mL, p < 0.0001). Patients (2/11) with inducible regional WMA at high-resolution post-exercise cine imaging revealed significant coronary artery stenosis in subsequently performed invasive coronary angiography. 

Conclusion: Exercise-CMR using our newly developed 3T MR-conditional pedal ergometer is clinically feasible. Imaging of both cardiac response and myocardial ischemia, triggered by dynamic stress, is rapidly conducted while the patient is near their peak heart rate.

Abstract

Background: Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) remains underutilized as an exercise imaging modality, mostly because of the limited availability of MR-compatible exercise equipment. This study prospectively evaluates the clinical feasibility of a newly developed MR-conditional pedal ergometer for exercise CMR

Methods: Ten healthy volunteers (mean age 44 ± 16 years) and 11 patients (mean age 60 ± 9 years) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent rest and post-exercise cinematic 3T CMR. Visual analysis of wall motion abnormalities (WMA) was rated by 2 experienced radiologists, and volumes and ejection fractions (EF) were determined. Image quality was assessed by a 4-point Likert scale for visibility of endocardial borders. 

Results: Median subjective image quality of real-time Cine at rest was 1 (IQR 1–2) and 2 (IQR 2–2.5) for post-exercise real-time Cine (p = 0.001). Exercise induced a significant increase in heart rate (62 [62–73] to 111 [104–143] bpm, p < 0.0001). Stroke volume and cardiac index increased from resting to post-exercise conditions (85 ± 21 to 101 ± 19 mL and 2.9 ± 0.7 to 6.6 ± 1.9 L/min/m2, respectively; both p < 0.0001), driven by a reduction in end-systolic volume (55 ± 20 to 42 ± 21 mL, p < 0.0001). Patients (2/11) with inducible regional WMA at high-resolution post-exercise cine imaging revealed significant coronary artery stenosis in subsequently performed invasive coronary angiography. 

Conclusion: Exercise-CMR using our newly developed 3T MR-conditional pedal ergometer is clinically feasible. Imaging of both cardiac response and myocardial ischemia, triggered by dynamic stress, is rapidly conducted while the patient is near their peak heart rate.

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Keywords

feasibility study, cine magnetic resonance imaging, stroke volume, physiological stress, heart rate

About this article
Title

Cardiac exercise imaging using a 3-tesla magnetic resonance-conditional pedal ergometer: Preliminary results in healthy volunteers and patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2021-08-17

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2021.0095

Pubmed

34490601

Keywords

feasibility study
cine magnetic resonance imaging
stroke volume
physiological stress
heart rate

Authors

Agnes Mayr
Gert Klug
Sebastian J. Reinstadler
Regina Esterhammer
Christian Kremser
Klemens Mairer
Bernhard Metzler
Michael F. Schocke

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