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Published online: 2020-12-31
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Sex difference after acute myocardial infarction patients with a history of current smoking and long-term clinical outcomes: Results of KAMIR Registry

Yong Hoon Kim, Ae-Young Her, Myung Ho Jeong, Byeong-Keuk Kim, Sung-Jin Hong, Seunghwan Kim, Chul-Min Ahn, Jung-Sun Kim, Young-Guk Ko, Donghoon Choi, Myeong-Ki Hong, Yangsoo Jang
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0185
·
Pubmed: 33438183

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-12-31

Abstract

Background: The contribution of sex as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease still remains controversial. The present study investigated the impact of sex on long-term clinical outcomes in Korean acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with a history of current smoking on admission after drug-eluting stents (DESs).

Methods: A total of 12,565 AMI patients (male: n = 11767 vs. female: n = 798) were enrolled. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) comprising all-cause death, recurrent myocardial infarction (Re-MI), and any repeat revascularization were the primary outcomes that were compared between the two groups. Probable or definite stent thrombosis (ST) was the secondary outcome.

Results: After adjustment, the early (30 days) cumulative incidences of MACEs (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.457; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.021–2.216; p = 0.035) and all-cause death (aHR: 1.699; 95% CI: 1.074–2.687; p = 0.023) were significantly higher in the female group than in the male group. At 2 years, the cumulative incidences of all-cause death (aHR: 1.561; 95% CI: 1.103–2.210; p = 0.012) and Re-MI (aHR: 1.880; 95% CI: 1.089–2.974; p = 0.022) were significantly higher in the female group than in the male group. However, the cumulative incidences of ST were similar between the two groups (aHR: 1.207; 95% CI: 0.583–2.497; p = 0.613).

Conclusions: The female group showed worse short-term and long-term clinical outcomes compared with the male group comprised of Korean AMI patients with a history of current smoking after successful DES implantation. However, further studies are required to confirm these results.

Abstract

Background: The contribution of sex as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease still remains controversial. The present study investigated the impact of sex on long-term clinical outcomes in Korean acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients with a history of current smoking on admission after drug-eluting stents (DESs).

Methods: A total of 12,565 AMI patients (male: n = 11767 vs. female: n = 798) were enrolled. Major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) comprising all-cause death, recurrent myocardial infarction (Re-MI), and any repeat revascularization were the primary outcomes that were compared between the two groups. Probable or definite stent thrombosis (ST) was the secondary outcome.

Results: After adjustment, the early (30 days) cumulative incidences of MACEs (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]: 1.457; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.021–2.216; p = 0.035) and all-cause death (aHR: 1.699; 95% CI: 1.074–2.687; p = 0.023) were significantly higher in the female group than in the male group. At 2 years, the cumulative incidences of all-cause death (aHR: 1.561; 95% CI: 1.103–2.210; p = 0.012) and Re-MI (aHR: 1.880; 95% CI: 1.089–2.974; p = 0.022) were significantly higher in the female group than in the male group. However, the cumulative incidences of ST were similar between the two groups (aHR: 1.207; 95% CI: 0.583–2.497; p = 0.613).

Conclusions: The female group showed worse short-term and long-term clinical outcomes compared with the male group comprised of Korean AMI patients with a history of current smoking after successful DES implantation. However, further studies are required to confirm these results.

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Keywords

myocardial infarction, sex, smoking

About this article
Title

Sex difference after acute myocardial infarction patients with a history of current smoking and long-term clinical outcomes: Results of KAMIR Registry

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2020-12-31

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0185

Pubmed

33438183

Keywords

myocardial infarction
sex
smoking

Authors

Yong Hoon Kim
Ae-Young Her
Myung Ho Jeong
Byeong-Keuk Kim
Sung-Jin Hong
Seunghwan Kim
Chul-Min Ahn
Jung-Sun Kim
Young-Guk Ko
Donghoon Choi
Myeong-Ki Hong
Yangsoo Jang

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