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Research paper
Published online: 2020-03-18
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Does left ventricular reverse remodeling influence long-term outcomes in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy?

Marcelo Arruda Nakazone, Ana Paula Otaviano, Maurício Nassau Machado, Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0038
·
Pubmed: 32207838

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-03-18

Abstract

Background: The impact of left ventricular reverse remodeling (LVRR) on the prognosis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of LVRR can predict mortality in these patients.

Methods: From January 2000 to December 2010, the medical charts of 159 patients were reviewed. LVRR was defined as an increase of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and a decrease of left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDD) by two-dimensional echocardiography. No patient underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy or required mechanical ventricular assistance.

Results: At baseline, median (25th–75th) LVDD was 64 mm (59–70), and median LVEF was 33.2% (26.4–40.1). LVRR was detected in 24.5% of patients in a 40-month (26–64) median follow-up. In the LVRR group, LVDD decreased from 64mm (59–68) to 60 mm (56–65; p < 0.001), and LVEF increased from 31.3% (24.1–39.0) to 42.5% (32.2–47.7; p < 0.001). However, LVRR was not associated with heart failure hospitalization, cardiogenic shock, heart transplantation, or mortality (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). The Cox proportional hazard model analysis identified only cardiogenic shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.51–3.85; p < 0.001) and serum sodium level (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86–0.96; p < 0.001) as independent predictors of all-cause mortality.

Conclusions: Left ventricular reverse remodeling occurs in one quarter of patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy and have no impact on the outcome of patients with this condition.

Abstract

Background: The impact of left ventricular reverse remodeling (LVRR) on the prognosis of Chagas cardiomyopathy is unknown. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of LVRR can predict mortality in these patients.

Methods: From January 2000 to December 2010, the medical charts of 159 patients were reviewed. LVRR was defined as an increase of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and a decrease of left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVDD) by two-dimensional echocardiography. No patient underwent cardiac resynchronization therapy or required mechanical ventricular assistance.

Results: At baseline, median (25th–75th) LVDD was 64 mm (59–70), and median LVEF was 33.2% (26.4–40.1). LVRR was detected in 24.5% of patients in a 40-month (26–64) median follow-up. In the LVRR group, LVDD decreased from 64mm (59–68) to 60 mm (56–65; p < 0.001), and LVEF increased from 31.3% (24.1–39.0) to 42.5% (32.2–47.7; p < 0.001). However, LVRR was not associated with heart failure hospitalization, cardiogenic shock, heart transplantation, or mortality (p > 0.05 for all comparisons). The Cox proportional hazard model analysis identified only cardiogenic shock (hazard ratio [HR]: 2.41; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.51–3.85; p < 0.001) and serum sodium level (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI: 0.86–0.96; p < 0.001) as independent predictors of all-cause mortality.

Conclusions: Left ventricular reverse remodeling occurs in one quarter of patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy and have no impact on the outcome of patients with this condition.

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Keywords

left ventricular remodeling, heart failure, Chagas cardiomyopathy, prognosis; mortality

About this article
Title

Does left ventricular reverse remodeling influence long-term outcomes in patients with Chagas cardiomyopathy?

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2020-03-18

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0038

Pubmed

32207838

Keywords

left ventricular remodeling
heart failure
Chagas cardiomyopathy
prognosis
mortality

Authors

Marcelo Arruda Nakazone
Ana Paula Otaviano
Maurício Nassau Machado
Reinaldo Bulgarelli Bestetti

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