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Research paper
Published online: 2020-03-18
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Elevated serum miR-133a predicts patients at risk of periprocedural myocardial injury after elective percutaneous coronary intervention

You Zhou, Zhangwei Chen, Ao Chen, Jiaqi Ma, Juying Qian, Junbo Ge
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0034
·
Pubmed: 32207842

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-03-18

Abstract

Background: Periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) is a frequent complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) associated with poor prognosis. However, no effective method has been found to identify patients at risk of PMI before the procedure. MicroRNA-133a (miR-133a) has been reported as a novel biomarker in various cardiovascular diseases. Herein, it was sought to determine whether circulating miR-133a could predict PMI before the procedure.

Methods: Eighty patients with negative preoperative values of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) receiving elective PCI for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) were recruited. Venous serum samples were collected on admission and within 16–24 hours post-PCI for miRNA measurements. PMI was defined as a cTnT value above the 99% upper reference limit (URL) after the procedure. The association between miR-133a and PMI was further assessed.

Results: Periprocedural myocardial injury occurred in 48 patients. The circulating level of miR-133a was significantly higher in patients with PMI before and after the procedure (both p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of the preoperative miR-133a level revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.891, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 71.9% to predict PMI. Additionally, a decrease was found in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in parallel with an increase in miR-133a levels in patients with PMI.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates for the first time that serum miR-133a can be used as a novel biomarker for early identification of stable CAD patients at risk of PMI undergoing elective PCI. The miR-133a-FGFR1 axis may be involved in the pathogenesis of PMI.

Abstract

Background: Periprocedural myocardial injury (PMI) is a frequent complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) associated with poor prognosis. However, no effective method has been found to identify patients at risk of PMI before the procedure. MicroRNA-133a (miR-133a) has been reported as a novel biomarker in various cardiovascular diseases. Herein, it was sought to determine whether circulating miR-133a could predict PMI before the procedure.

Methods: Eighty patients with negative preoperative values of cardiac troponin T (cTnT) receiving elective PCI for stable coronary artery disease (CAD) were recruited. Venous serum samples were collected on admission and within 16–24 hours post-PCI for miRNA measurements. PMI was defined as a cTnT value above the 99% upper reference limit (URL) after the procedure. The association between miR-133a and PMI was further assessed.

Results: Periprocedural myocardial injury occurred in 48 patients. The circulating level of miR-133a was significantly higher in patients with PMI before and after the procedure (both p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis of the preoperative miR-133a level revealed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.891, with a sensitivity of 93.8% and a specificity of 71.9% to predict PMI. Additionally, a decrease was found in fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) in parallel with an increase in miR-133a levels in patients with PMI.

Conclusions: This study demonstrates for the first time that serum miR-133a can be used as a novel biomarker for early identification of stable CAD patients at risk of PMI undergoing elective PCI. The miR-133a-FGFR1 axis may be involved in the pathogenesis of PMI.

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Keywords

periprocedural myocardial injury, percutaneous coronary intervention, microRNA-133a

About this article
Title

Elevated serum miR-133a predicts patients at risk of periprocedural myocardial injury after elective percutaneous coronary intervention

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2020-03-18

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0034

Pubmed

32207842

Keywords

periprocedural myocardial injury
percutaneous coronary intervention
microRNA-133a

Authors

You Zhou
Zhangwei Chen
Ao Chen
Jiaqi Ma
Juying Qian
Junbo Ge

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