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Published online: 2020-02-25
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Usefulness of soluble endothelial protein C receptor combined with left ventricular global longitudinal strain for predicting slow coronary flow: A case-control study

Yonghuai Wang, Hang Yu, Cuiting Zhao, Guangyuan Li, Jun Yang, Dalin Jia, Chunyan Ma
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0027
·
Pubmed: 32104901

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-02-25

Abstract

Background: Slow coronary flow (SCF) is an angiographic entity characterized by delayed coronary opacification without an evident obstructive lesion in the epicardial coronary artery. However, patients with SCF have decreased left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS). SCF is associated with inflammation, and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR) is a potential biomarker of inflammation. Therefore, under evaluation herein, was the relationship between SCF and sEPCR and the predictive value of sEPCR and LV GLS for SCF was investigated.

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with SCF and 34 controls were enrolled. SCF was diagnosed by the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count (TFC). The plasma level of sEPCR was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LV GLS was measured by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

Results: Plasma sEPCR was significantly higher in patients with SCF than in controls and was positively correlated with the mean TFC (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) and number of involved vessels (r = 0.61, p < 0.001). LV GLS was decreased in patients with SCF compared to that in controls. sEPCR level (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.55–6.36, p = 0.001) and LV GLS (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.02–2.04, p = 0.04) were independent predictors of SCF. sEPCR predicted SCF (area under curve [AUC]: 0.83); however, sEPCR > 9.63 ng/mL combined with LV GLS > −14.36% demonstrated better predictive power (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 75%; specificity: 91%).

Conclusions: Patients with SCF have increased plasma sEPCR and decreased LV GLS. sEPCR may be a useful potential biomarker for SCF, and sEPCR combined with LV GLS can better predict SCF.

Abstract

Background: Slow coronary flow (SCF) is an angiographic entity characterized by delayed coronary opacification without an evident obstructive lesion in the epicardial coronary artery. However, patients with SCF have decreased left ventricular (LV) global longitudinal strain (GLS). SCF is associated with inflammation, and soluble endothelial protein C receptor (sEPCR) is a potential biomarker of inflammation. Therefore, under evaluation herein, was the relationship between SCF and sEPCR and the predictive value of sEPCR and LV GLS for SCF was investigated.

Methods: Twenty-eight patients with SCF and 34 controls were enrolled. SCF was diagnosed by the thrombolysis in myocardial infarction frame count (TFC). The plasma level of sEPCR was quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. LV GLS was measured by two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography.

Results: Plasma sEPCR was significantly higher in patients with SCF than in controls and was positively correlated with the mean TFC (r = 0.67, p < 0.001) and number of involved vessels (r = 0.61, p < 0.001). LV GLS was decreased in patients with SCF compared to that in controls. sEPCR level (OR = 3.14, 95% CI 1.55–6.36, p = 0.001) and LV GLS (OR = 1.44, 95% CI 1.02–2.04, p = 0.04) were independent predictors of SCF. sEPCR predicted SCF (area under curve [AUC]: 0.83); however, sEPCR > 9.63 ng/mL combined with LV GLS > −14.36% demonstrated better predictive power (AUC: 0.89; sensitivity: 75%; specificity: 91%).

Conclusions: Patients with SCF have increased plasma sEPCR and decreased LV GLS. sEPCR may be a useful potential biomarker for SCF, and sEPCR combined with LV GLS can better predict SCF.

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Keywords

slow coronary flow, endothelial protein C receptor, global longitudinal strain, left ventricle

About this article
Title

Usefulness of soluble endothelial protein C receptor combined with left ventricular global longitudinal strain for predicting slow coronary flow: A case-control study

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2020-02-25

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0027

Pubmed

32104901

Keywords

slow coronary flow
endothelial protein C receptor
global longitudinal strain
left ventricle

Authors

Yonghuai Wang
Hang Yu
Cuiting Zhao
Guangyuan Li
Jun Yang
Dalin Jia
Chunyan Ma

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