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Published online: 2020-02-05
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The impact of readiness to discharge from hospital on adherence to treatment in patients after myocardial infarction

Agata Kosobucka, Piotr Michalski, Łukasz Pietrzykowski, Michał Kasprzak, Tomasz Fabiszak, Mirosława Felsmann, Aldona Kubica
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0005
·
Pubmed: 32037501

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-02-05

Abstract

Background: The healthcare professionals involved in in-hospital treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) are also responsible to patients for their education before leaving the hospital.   This education aims to modify patient behaviour in order to reduce relevant risk factors and improve self-control and adherence to medications. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between readiness for discharge from hospital and adherence to treatment at follow-up in MI patients.

Methods: An observational, single-center, MI cohort study with  6-month follow-up was conducted between May 2015 and July 2016.  The Readiness for Hospital Discharge after Myocardial Infarction Scale (RHD-MIS) and the Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale (ACDS) were applied.

Results: Two hundred and thirteen patients aged 30–91 years (62.91 ± 11.26) were enrolled in the study. The RHD-MIS general score ranged from 29 to 69 points (51.16 ± 9.87).   A high level of readiness was found in 66 patients (31%), intermediate in 92 (43.2%), and low in 55 (25.8%) of patients. Adherence level assessed with the ACDS 6-months after discharge from hospital ranged from 7 to 28 points (23.34 ± 4.06). An increase in objective assessment of patient knowledge according to RHD-MIS subscale resulted in significantly higher level of adherence at the follow-up visit (p = 0.0154); R Spearman = 0.16671, p = 0.015; p for trend = 0.005. During the 6-month follow-up 3 (1.41%) patients died and 17 (7.98%) were hospitalized for a subsequent acute coronary syndrome.

Conclusions: This study provided preliminary evidence of a long-term association between the results of assessment of readiness for discharge from hospital and adherence to treatment in patients after MI.

Abstract

Background: The healthcare professionals involved in in-hospital treatment of myocardial infarction (MI) are also responsible to patients for their education before leaving the hospital.   This education aims to modify patient behaviour in order to reduce relevant risk factors and improve self-control and adherence to medications. The aim of the study was to analyse the relationship between readiness for discharge from hospital and adherence to treatment at follow-up in MI patients.

Methods: An observational, single-center, MI cohort study with  6-month follow-up was conducted between May 2015 and July 2016.  The Readiness for Hospital Discharge after Myocardial Infarction Scale (RHD-MIS) and the Adherence in Chronic Diseases Scale (ACDS) were applied.

Results: Two hundred and thirteen patients aged 30–91 years (62.91 ± 11.26) were enrolled in the study. The RHD-MIS general score ranged from 29 to 69 points (51.16 ± 9.87).   A high level of readiness was found in 66 patients (31%), intermediate in 92 (43.2%), and low in 55 (25.8%) of patients. Adherence level assessed with the ACDS 6-months after discharge from hospital ranged from 7 to 28 points (23.34 ± 4.06). An increase in objective assessment of patient knowledge according to RHD-MIS subscale resulted in significantly higher level of adherence at the follow-up visit (p = 0.0154); R Spearman = 0.16671, p = 0.015; p for trend = 0.005. During the 6-month follow-up 3 (1.41%) patients died and 17 (7.98%) were hospitalized for a subsequent acute coronary syndrome.

Conclusions: This study provided preliminary evidence of a long-term association between the results of assessment of readiness for discharge from hospital and adherence to treatment in patients after MI.

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Keywords

readiness for discharge from the hospital, adherence, myocardial infarction, coronary artery disease, antiplatelet treatment, questionnaire, scale

About this article
Title

The impact of readiness to discharge from hospital on adherence to treatment in patients after myocardial infarction

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2020-02-05

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0005

Pubmed

32037501

Keywords

readiness for discharge from the hospital
adherence
myocardial infarction
coronary artery disease
antiplatelet treatment
questionnaire
scale

Authors

Agata Kosobucka
Piotr Michalski
Łukasz Pietrzykowski
Michał Kasprzak
Tomasz Fabiszak
Mirosława Felsmann
Aldona Kubica

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