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Research paper
Published online: 2019-04-11
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Poor long-term outcome in acute coronary syndrome in a real-life setting: Ten-year outcome of the TACOS study

Kaari K. Konttila, Kimmo Koivula, Markku J. Eskola, Mika Martiskainen, Heini Huhtala, Vesa K. Virtanen, Jussi Mikkelsson, Kati Järvelä, Kari O. Niemelä, Pekka J. Karhunen, Kjell C. Nikus
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2019.0037
·
Pubmed: 30994181

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2019-04-11

Abstract

Background: Long-term outcome of the three categories of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in real-life patient cohorts is not well known. The objective of this study was to survey the 10-year outcome of an ACS patient cohort admitted to a university hospital and to explore factors affecting the outcome.

Methods: A total of 1188 consecutive patients (median age 73 years) with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina pectoris (UA) in 2002–2003 were included and followed up for ≥ 10 years.

Results: Mortality for STEMI, NSTEMI and UA patients during the follow-up period was 52.5%, 69.9% and 41.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, only age and creatinine level at admission were independently associated with patient outcome in all the three ACS categories when analyzed separately.

Conclusions: All the three ACS categories proved to have high mortality rates during long-term follow-up in a real-life patient cohort. NSTEMI patients had worse outcome than STEMI and UA patients during the whole follow-up period. Our study results indicate clear differences in the prognostic significance of various demographic and therapeutic parameters within the three ACS categories.

Abstract

Background: Long-term outcome of the three categories of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in real-life patient cohorts is not well known. The objective of this study was to survey the 10-year outcome of an ACS patient cohort admitted to a university hospital and to explore factors affecting the outcome.

Methods: A total of 1188 consecutive patients (median age 73 years) with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or unstable angina pectoris (UA) in 2002–2003 were included and followed up for ≥ 10 years.

Results: Mortality for STEMI, NSTEMI and UA patients during the follow-up period was 52.5%, 69.9% and 41.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. In multivariable Cox regression analysis, only age and creatinine level at admission were independently associated with patient outcome in all the three ACS categories when analyzed separately.

Conclusions: All the three ACS categories proved to have high mortality rates during long-term follow-up in a real-life patient cohort. NSTEMI patients had worse outcome than STEMI and UA patients during the whole follow-up period. Our study results indicate clear differences in the prognostic significance of various demographic and therapeutic parameters within the three ACS categories.

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Keywords

acute coronary syndrome, myocardial infarction, prognosis, unstable angina

About this article
Title

Poor long-term outcome in acute coronary syndrome in a real-life setting: Ten-year outcome of the TACOS study

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Research paper

Published online

2019-04-11

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2019.0037

Pubmed

30994181

Keywords

acute coronary syndrome
myocardial infarction
prognosis
unstable angina

Authors

Kaari K. Konttila
Kimmo Koivula
Markku J. Eskola
Mika Martiskainen
Heini Huhtala
Vesa K. Virtanen
Jussi Mikkelsson
Kati Järvelä
Kari O. Niemelä
Pekka J. Karhunen
Kjell C. Nikus

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