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A patient-centered multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation program improves glycemic control and functional outcome in coronary artery disease after percutaneous and surgical revascularization

Andrea Denegri, Valentina A. Rossi, Fabrizio Vaghi, Paolo Di Muro, Martino Regazzi, Tiziano Moccetti, Elena Pasotti, Giovanni B. Pedrazzini, Mauro Capoferri, Marco Moccetti
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2020.0006
·
Pubmed: 32037504

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2020-01-21

Abstract

Background: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is strongly associated with all-cause mortality reduction in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of CR on pathological risk factors, such as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and functional recovery remains under debate. The aim of the present study is to determine whether CR has a positive effect on physical exercise improvement and on pathological risk factors in IGT and diabetic patients with CAD.

Methods: One hundred and seventy-one consecutive patients participating in a 3-month CR from January 2014 to June 2015 were enrolled. The primary endpoint was defined as an improvement of peak workload and VO2-peak; glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction was considered as a secondary endpoint.

Results: Euglycemic patients presented a significant improvement in peak workload compared to diabetic patients (from 5.75 ± 1.45 to 6.65 ± 1.84 METs, p = 0.018 vs. 4.8 ± 0.8 to 4.9 ± 1.4 METs). VO2-peak improved in euglycemic patients (VO2-peak from 19.3 ± 5.3 mL/min/kg to 22.5 ± 5.9, p = 0.003), while diabetic patients did not present  a  statistically significant trend (VO2-peak from 16.9 ± 4.4 mL/min/kg to 18.0 ± 3.8, p < 0.056). Diabetic patients have benefited more in terms of blood glucose control compared to IGT patients (HbA1c from 7.7 ± 1.0 to 7.4 ± 1.1 compared to 5.6 ± 0.4 to 5.9 ± 0.5, p = 0.02, respectively).

Conclusions: A multidisciplinary CR program improves physical functional capacity in CAD setting, particularly in euglycemic patients. IGT patients as well as diabetic patients may benefit from a CR program, but long-term outcome needs to be clarified in larger studies.

Abstract

Background: Cardiac rehabilitation (CR) is strongly associated with all-cause mortality reduction in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The impact of CR on pathological risk factors, such as impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and functional recovery remains under debate. The aim of the present study is to determine whether CR has a positive effect on physical exercise improvement and on pathological risk factors in IGT and diabetic patients with CAD.

Methods: One hundred and seventy-one consecutive patients participating in a 3-month CR from January 2014 to June 2015 were enrolled. The primary endpoint was defined as an improvement of peak workload and VO2-peak; glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) reduction was considered as a secondary endpoint.

Results: Euglycemic patients presented a significant improvement in peak workload compared to diabetic patients (from 5.75 ± 1.45 to 6.65 ± 1.84 METs, p = 0.018 vs. 4.8 ± 0.8 to 4.9 ± 1.4 METs). VO2-peak improved in euglycemic patients (VO2-peak from 19.3 ± 5.3 mL/min/kg to 22.5 ± 5.9, p = 0.003), while diabetic patients did not present  a  statistically significant trend (VO2-peak from 16.9 ± 4.4 mL/min/kg to 18.0 ± 3.8, p < 0.056). Diabetic patients have benefited more in terms of blood glucose control compared to IGT patients (HbA1c from 7.7 ± 1.0 to 7.4 ± 1.1 compared to 5.6 ± 0.4 to 5.9 ± 0.5, p = 0.02, respectively).

Conclusions: A multidisciplinary CR program improves physical functional capacity in CAD setting, particularly in euglycemic patients. IGT patients as well as diabetic patients may benefit from a CR program, but long-term outcome needs to be clarified in larger studies.

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Keywords

cardiac rehabilitation, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus, reduced glucose tolerance, cardiopulmonary test

About this article
Title

A patient-centered multidisciplinary cardiac rehabilitation program improves glycemic control and functional outcome in coronary artery disease after percutaneous and surgical revascularization

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Published online

2020-01-21

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2020.0006

Pubmed

32037504

Keywords

cardiac rehabilitation
coronary artery disease
diabetes mellitus
reduced glucose tolerance
cardiopulmonary test

Authors

Andrea Denegri
Valentina A. Rossi
Fabrizio Vaghi
Paolo Di Muro
Martino Regazzi
Tiziano Moccetti
Elena Pasotti
Giovanni B. Pedrazzini
Mauro Capoferri
Marco Moccetti

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