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Published online: 2018-12-20
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Elective lung resection increases spatial QRS-T angle and QTc interval

Szymon Bialka, Andrzej Jaroszynski, Todd T. Schlegel, Hanna Misiolek, Damian Czyzewski, Marek Sawicki, Piotr Skoczylas, Magdalena Bielacz, Mateusz Bialy, Lukasz Szarpak, Wojciech Dabrowski
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2018.0159
·
Pubmed: 30575004

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2018-12-20

Abstract

Background: Lung resection changes intra-thoracic anatomy, which may affect electrocardiographic results. While postoperative cardiac arrhythmias have been recognized after lung resection, no study has documented changes in vectorcardiographic variables in patients undergoing this surgery. The purpose of this study was to analyse changes in spatial QRS-T angle (spQRS-T) and corrected QT interval (QTc) after lung resection. Methods: Adult patients undergoing elective lung resection under general anaesthesia were studied. The patients were allocated into four groups: those undergoing (1) left lobectomy (LL); (2) left pneumonectomy (LP); (3) right lobectomy (RL); and (4) right pneumonectomy (RP). The spatial QRS-T angle and QTc were measured one day before surgery (baseline) and 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. Results: Seventy-one adult patients (47 men and 24 women) aged 47–80 (65 ± 7) were studied. In the study group as a whole, lung resection was associated with significant increases in spQRS-T (p < 0.001) and QTc (p < 0.05 at 24 and 48 h and p < 0.01 at 72 h). The greatest changes were noted in patients undergoing LP. Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) was noted in 6.4% of patients studied, in whom the widest spQRS-T and the most prolonged QTc intervals were also noted. Conclusions: Lung resection widens the spQRS-T angle and prolongs the QTc interval, especially in patients undergoing LP. While postoperative AF was a relatively rare complication after lung resection in this study, it was associated with the widest spQRS-T angles and most prolonged QTc intervals.

Abstract

Background: Lung resection changes intra-thoracic anatomy, which may affect electrocardiographic results. While postoperative cardiac arrhythmias have been recognized after lung resection, no study has documented changes in vectorcardiographic variables in patients undergoing this surgery. The purpose of this study was to analyse changes in spatial QRS-T angle (spQRS-T) and corrected QT interval (QTc) after lung resection. Methods: Adult patients undergoing elective lung resection under general anaesthesia were studied. The patients were allocated into four groups: those undergoing (1) left lobectomy (LL); (2) left pneumonectomy (LP); (3) right lobectomy (RL); and (4) right pneumonectomy (RP). The spatial QRS-T angle and QTc were measured one day before surgery (baseline) and 24, 48 and 72 h after surgery. Results: Seventy-one adult patients (47 men and 24 women) aged 47–80 (65 ± 7) were studied. In the study group as a whole, lung resection was associated with significant increases in spQRS-T (p < 0.001) and QTc (p < 0.05 at 24 and 48 h and p < 0.01 at 72 h). The greatest changes were noted in patients undergoing LP. Postoperative atrial fibrillation (AF) was noted in 6.4% of patients studied, in whom the widest spQRS-T and the most prolonged QTc intervals were also noted. Conclusions: Lung resection widens the spQRS-T angle and prolongs the QTc interval, especially in patients undergoing LP. While postoperative AF was a relatively rare complication after lung resection in this study, it was associated with the widest spQRS-T angles and most prolonged QTc intervals.

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Keywords

vectorcardiography, spatial QRS-T angle, corrected QT interval, atrial fibrillation, general anaesthesia

About this article
Title

Elective lung resection increases spatial QRS-T angle and QTc interval

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2018-12-20

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2018.0159

Pubmed

30575004

Keywords

vectorcardiography
spatial QRS-T angle
corrected QT interval
atrial fibrillation
general anaesthesia

Authors

Szymon Bialka
Andrzej Jaroszynski
Todd T. Schlegel
Hanna Misiolek
Damian Czyzewski
Marek Sawicki
Piotr Skoczylas
Magdalena Bielacz
Mateusz Bialy
Lukasz Szarpak
Wojciech Dabrowski

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