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Published online: 2018-12-13
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Risk factor paradox: No prognostic impact of arterial hypertension and smoking in patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias

Kathrin Weidner, Michael Behnes, Jonas Rusnak, Gabriel Taton, Tobias Schupp, Linda Reiser, Armin Bollow, Thomas Reichelt, Dominik Ellguth, Niko Engelke, Philip Kuche, Jorge Hoppner, Ibrahim El-Battrawy, Siegfried Lang, Christoph A. Nienaber, Kambis Mashayekhi, Dennis Ferdinand, Christel Weiß, Martin Borggrefe, Ibrahim Akin
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2018.0158
·
Pubmed: 30566210

open access

Ahead of print
Original articles
Published online: 2018-12-13

Abstract

Background: Data regarding the outcome of patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias related to arterial hypertension (AHT) and smoking is limited. The study sought to assess the prognostic impact of AHT and smoking on survival in patients presenting with ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

Methods: All consecutive patients surviving ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) upon admission to the University Medical Center Mannheim (UMM), Germany from 2002 to 2016 were included and stratified according to AHT and smoking by propensity score matching. The primary prognostic endpoint was all-cause mortality at 30 months.  

Results: A total of 988 AHT-matched patients (494 each, with and without AHT) and a total of 872 smoking-matched patients (436 each, with and without smoking) were included. The rates of VT and VF were similar in both groups (VT: AHT 60% vs. no AHT 60%; smokers 61% vs. non-smokers 62%; VF: AHT 35% vs. no AHT 38%; smokers 39% vs. non-smokers 38%). Neither AHT nor smoking were associated with the primary endpoint of long-term all-cause mortality at 30 months (long-term mortality rates: AHT/no AHT, 26% vs. 28%; log-rank p=0.525; smoking/non-smoking, 22% vs. 25%; log-rank p = 0.683).

Conclusions: Paradoxically, neither AHT nor smoking were associated with differences of long-term all-cause mortality in patients presenting with ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

Abstract

Background: Data regarding the outcome of patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias related to arterial hypertension (AHT) and smoking is limited. The study sought to assess the prognostic impact of AHT and smoking on survival in patients presenting with ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

Methods: All consecutive patients surviving ventricular tachycardia (VT) and ventricular fibrillation (VF) upon admission to the University Medical Center Mannheim (UMM), Germany from 2002 to 2016 were included and stratified according to AHT and smoking by propensity score matching. The primary prognostic endpoint was all-cause mortality at 30 months.  

Results: A total of 988 AHT-matched patients (494 each, with and without AHT) and a total of 872 smoking-matched patients (436 each, with and without smoking) were included. The rates of VT and VF were similar in both groups (VT: AHT 60% vs. no AHT 60%; smokers 61% vs. non-smokers 62%; VF: AHT 35% vs. no AHT 38%; smokers 39% vs. non-smokers 38%). Neither AHT nor smoking were associated with the primary endpoint of long-term all-cause mortality at 30 months (long-term mortality rates: AHT/no AHT, 26% vs. 28%; log-rank p=0.525; smoking/non-smoking, 22% vs. 25%; log-rank p = 0.683).

Conclusions: Paradoxically, neither AHT nor smoking were associated with differences of long-term all-cause mortality in patients presenting with ventricular tachyarrhythmias.

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Keywords

ventricular tachyarrhythmias, arterial hypertension, smoking, long-term all-cause mortality

About this article
Title

Risk factor paradox: No prognostic impact of arterial hypertension and smoking in patients with ventricular tachyarrhythmias

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Ahead of print

Article type

Original Article

Published online

2018-12-13

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2018.0158

Pubmed

30566210

Keywords

ventricular tachyarrhythmias
arterial hypertension
smoking
long-term all-cause mortality

Authors

Kathrin Weidner
Michael Behnes
Jonas Rusnak
Gabriel Taton
Tobias Schupp
Linda Reiser
Armin Bollow
Thomas Reichelt
Dominik Ellguth
Niko Engelke
Philip Kuche
Jorge Hoppner
Ibrahim El-Battrawy
Siegfried Lang
Christoph A. Nienaber
Kambis Mashayekhi
Dennis Ferdinand
Christel Weiß
Martin Borggrefe
Ibrahim Akin

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