open access

Vol 24, No 6 (2017)
Original articles — Clinical cardiology
Published online: 2017-06-12
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The influence of plasma 25-(OH) vitamin D levels in acute ST elevation myocardial infarction

Ömer Şen, Mustafa Topuz, Armağan Acele, Oğuz Akkuş, Ahmet Oytun Baykan, Mevlüt Koç
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2017.0066
·
Pubmed: 28612906
·
Cardiol J 2017;24(6):677-684.

open access

Vol 24, No 6 (2017)
Original articles — Clinical cardiology
Published online: 2017-06-12

Abstract

Background: The preventive role of acute occurring of collateral circulation (AOCC) to infarct related artery (IRA) in patients presenting with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is well known. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether there is an association between admission plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3) levels and grade of collateralization in patients with STEMI. Methods: We prospectively included 369 STEMI patients within the first 12 h of symptoms onset. Patients were divided into two groups according to their Rentrop collateralization grade to IRA: poorly developed collateral (PDC) group (Rentrop grade ≤ 1, 272 patients) and well developed collateral (WDC) group (Rentrop grade ≥ 2, 97 patients). Results: We observed that AOCC grade to IRA was negatively correlated with high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as well as peak troponin T levels, yet positively correlated with admission plasma 25(OH)D3 level (p < 0.05, for all). In multi¬variate analysis, 25(OH)D3 levels (OR 1.246, 95% CI 1.185–1.310, p < 0.001), together with hs-CRP, NT-proBNP, and peak troponin T levels were found independent predictors of AOCC to IRA in patients with acute STEMI. Conclusions: Admission level of plasma 25(OH)D3 levels together with cardiac risk biomarkers (troponin T, NT-proBNP, hs-CRP) are associated with collateralization grade to IRA in acute STEMI patients. In addition, 25(OH)D3 may be a promoter of AOCC in patients with acute STEMI.

Abstract

Background: The preventive role of acute occurring of collateral circulation (AOCC) to infarct related artery (IRA) in patients presenting with acute ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is well known. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether there is an association between admission plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D3) levels and grade of collateralization in patients with STEMI. Methods: We prospectively included 369 STEMI patients within the first 12 h of symptoms onset. Patients were divided into two groups according to their Rentrop collateralization grade to IRA: poorly developed collateral (PDC) group (Rentrop grade ≤ 1, 272 patients) and well developed collateral (WDC) group (Rentrop grade ≥ 2, 97 patients). Results: We observed that AOCC grade to IRA was negatively correlated with high sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), N terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), as well as peak troponin T levels, yet positively correlated with admission plasma 25(OH)D3 level (p < 0.05, for all). In multi¬variate analysis, 25(OH)D3 levels (OR 1.246, 95% CI 1.185–1.310, p < 0.001), together with hs-CRP, NT-proBNP, and peak troponin T levels were found independent predictors of AOCC to IRA in patients with acute STEMI. Conclusions: Admission level of plasma 25(OH)D3 levels together with cardiac risk biomarkers (troponin T, NT-proBNP, hs-CRP) are associated with collateralization grade to IRA in acute STEMI patients. In addition, 25(OH)D3 may be a promoter of AOCC in patients with acute STEMI.
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Keywords

25-(OH) vitamin D, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, collateral development, arteriogenesis

About this article
Title

The influence of plasma 25-(OH) vitamin D levels in acute ST elevation myocardial infarction

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 24, No 6 (2017)

Pages

677-684

Published online

2017-06-12

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2017.0066

Pubmed

28612906

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2017;24(6):677-684.

Keywords

25-(OH) vitamin D
ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction
collateral development
arteriogenesis

Authors

Ömer Şen
Mustafa Topuz
Armağan Acele
Oğuz Akkuş
Ahmet Oytun Baykan
Mevlüt Koç

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