open access

Vol 23, No 2 (2016)
CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY AND HEART FAILURE - Original articles
Published online: 2016-04-29
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History of diabetes mellitus is associated with elevated cardiac troponin I levels in patients with chest pain but no coronary heart disease

Bin Zhong, Yazhu Wang, Guo Zhang
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.a2015.0072
·
Pubmed: 26503081
·
Cardiol J 2016;23(2):149-154.

open access

Vol 23, No 2 (2016)
CLINICAL CARDIOLOGY AND HEART FAILURE - Original articles
Published online: 2016-04-29

Abstract

Background: The factors and the mechanism contributing to an increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in patients with chest pain, at least one cardiovascular risk factor, and no evidence of coronary heart disease remains elusive.

Methods: Excluding patients with acute coronary syndrome and chronic myocardial isch­emia, we selected 362 consecutive patients with normal coronary angiography or computed tomography coronary angiography results or lesions causing < 50% stenosis in any of the coronary arteries from January 2012 to June 2015. Using a cut-off value of 0.01 ng/mL, patients with cTnI levels ≥ 0.01 ng/mL (164 patients) were compared with those with cTnI levels < 0.01 ng/mL. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between elevated cTnI and patient characteristics.

Results: Other than history of diabetes mellitus (DM) (18.90% vs. 8.08%, p = 0.002), the characteristics of the patients with and without elevated cTnI levels were similar. History of DM predicted elevation of cTnI level (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.55–7.20, p = 0.002) in logistic regression analysis.

Conclusions: In total, 45.30% of patients with chest pain had elevated cTnI levels with a mean level of 0.07 ± 0.10 ng/mL. History of DM rather than blood glucose level itself was associated with elevated cTnI levels, whereas female gender was protective against increases in cTnI levels.

Abstract

Background: The factors and the mechanism contributing to an increase in cardiac troponin I (cTnI) in patients with chest pain, at least one cardiovascular risk factor, and no evidence of coronary heart disease remains elusive.

Methods: Excluding patients with acute coronary syndrome and chronic myocardial isch­emia, we selected 362 consecutive patients with normal coronary angiography or computed tomography coronary angiography results or lesions causing < 50% stenosis in any of the coronary arteries from January 2012 to June 2015. Using a cut-off value of 0.01 ng/mL, patients with cTnI levels ≥ 0.01 ng/mL (164 patients) were compared with those with cTnI levels < 0.01 ng/mL. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate associations between elevated cTnI and patient characteristics.

Results: Other than history of diabetes mellitus (DM) (18.90% vs. 8.08%, p = 0.002), the characteristics of the patients with and without elevated cTnI levels were similar. History of DM predicted elevation of cTnI level (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.55–7.20, p = 0.002) in logistic regression analysis.

Conclusions: In total, 45.30% of patients with chest pain had elevated cTnI levels with a mean level of 0.07 ± 0.10 ng/mL. History of DM rather than blood glucose level itself was associated with elevated cTnI levels, whereas female gender was protective against increases in cTnI levels.

Get Citation

Keywords

diabetes mellitus, chest pain, cardiac troponin I, risk factors

About this article
Title

History of diabetes mellitus is associated with elevated cardiac troponin I levels in patients with chest pain but no coronary heart disease

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 23, No 2 (2016)

Pages

149-154

Published online

2016-04-29

DOI

10.5603/CJ.a2015.0072

Pubmed

26503081

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2016;23(2):149-154.

Keywords

diabetes mellitus
chest pain
cardiac troponin I
risk factors

Authors

Bin Zhong
Yazhu Wang
Guo Zhang

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