open access

Vol 20, No 5 (2013)
Original articles
Published online: 2013-09-30
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Does gender influence the impact of impaired renal function on prognosis after ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction?

Joon Seok Choi, Min Jee Kim, Yong Un Kang, Chang Seong Kim, Eun Hui Bae, Seong Kwon Ma, Young-Keun Ahn, Myung Ho Jeong, Young Jo Kim, Myeong Chan Cho, Chong Jin Kim, Soo Wan Kim, other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction
DOI: 10.5603/CJ.2013.0138
·
Cardiol J 2013;20(5):526-532.

open access

Vol 20, No 5 (2013)
Original articles
Published online: 2013-09-30

Abstract

Background: A limited number of studies have investigated the impact of gender on renal function and clinical outcomes after ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), and these studies have provided discrepant results.

Methods and Results: This study was based on a retrospective cohort, the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). Patients (n = 7,679) with a discharge diagnosis of STEMI were analyzed to investigate association of gender with renal function and clinical outcomes. Compared to men, women were older and exhibited more comorbidity, including impaired renal function. Women showed higher mortality compared to men (1-month mortality,5.6% in men vs. 12.6% in women, p < 0.001; 1-year mortality, 6.8% in men vs. 14.4% in women, p < 0.001). The risk of death proportionally increased as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased in both genders. After adjusting for potential confounders, hazard ratios for women did not significantly differ from those for men at each eGFR level.The interaction test showed no significant interaction between gender and eGFR in 1-month mortality and 1-year mortality.

Conclusions: Impaired renal function was an independent prognostic factor after STEMI in both genders, and the impact of impaired renal function on prognosis after STEMI did not significantly differ between genders.

Abstract

Background: A limited number of studies have investigated the impact of gender on renal function and clinical outcomes after ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction (STEMI), and these studies have provided discrepant results.

Methods and Results: This study was based on a retrospective cohort, the Korean Acute Myocardial Infarction Registry (KAMIR). Patients (n = 7,679) with a discharge diagnosis of STEMI were analyzed to investigate association of gender with renal function and clinical outcomes. Compared to men, women were older and exhibited more comorbidity, including impaired renal function. Women showed higher mortality compared to men (1-month mortality,5.6% in men vs. 12.6% in women, p < 0.001; 1-year mortality, 6.8% in men vs. 14.4% in women, p < 0.001). The risk of death proportionally increased as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased in both genders. After adjusting for potential confounders, hazard ratios for women did not significantly differ from those for men at each eGFR level.The interaction test showed no significant interaction between gender and eGFR in 1-month mortality and 1-year mortality.

Conclusions: Impaired renal function was an independent prognostic factor after STEMI in both genders, and the impact of impaired renal function on prognosis after STEMI did not significantly differ between genders.

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Keywords

gender, impaired renal function, ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction

About this article
Title

Does gender influence the impact of impaired renal function on prognosis after ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction?

Journal

Cardiology Journal

Issue

Vol 20, No 5 (2013)

Pages

526-532

Published online

2013-09-30

DOI

10.5603/CJ.2013.0138

Bibliographic record

Cardiol J 2013;20(5):526-532.

Keywords

gender
impaired renal function
ST-segment elevated myocardial infarction

Authors

Joon Seok Choi
Min Jee Kim
Yong Un Kang
Chang Seong Kim
Eun Hui Bae
Seong Kwon Ma
Young-Keun Ahn
Myung Ho Jeong
Young Jo Kim
Myeong Chan Cho
Chong Jin Kim
Soo Wan Kim
other Korea Acute Myocardial Infarction

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