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Vol 24, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-16
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Post-aerobic-exercise autonomic responses in hypertensives — a randomized controlled trial

Juliano Casonatto, Liane Sardi Oliveira, Kamila Grandolfi
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2020.0009
·
Arterial Hypertension 2020;24(2):74-82.

open access

Vol 24, No 2 (2020)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2020-06-16

Abstract

Background. Heart rate variability (HRV) response to an exercise bout may provide useful insight into autonomic stress reactivity. Considering that cardiovascular responses to a stressor may be predictive of certain diseases, it becomes critical to understand if high blood pressure can influence the autonomic nervous system response to acute exercise. We, therefore, undertook a study to investigate the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on autonomic responses in hypertensives.

Material and methods. Twenty hypertensives were randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups [control (CG) or exercise (EG)]. The exercise session was conducted on a treadmill and consisted of 40 min of running/walking at 60–70% HRreserve. In the control session, the participants remained seated in a quiet room for 40 min. After the exercise/control sessions, the HRV was recorded continuously for 60 min.

Results. The EG presented an increase with a large effect size for LF [1.0 (post-30) and 1.0 (post-60)] and LF/HF [0.8 (post-30) and 1.1 (post-60)]. Additionally, a reduction with a large effect was observed for HF [–1.0 (post-30) and –1.0 (post-60)].

Conclusion. There is a considerable reduction in post-aerobic-exercise parasympathetic activity and an increase in sympathetic activity. Therefore, a single bout of aerobic exercise is not able to quickly improve the cardiac autonomic regulation.

Abstract

Background. Heart rate variability (HRV) response to an exercise bout may provide useful insight into autonomic stress reactivity. Considering that cardiovascular responses to a stressor may be predictive of certain diseases, it becomes critical to understand if high blood pressure can influence the autonomic nervous system response to acute exercise. We, therefore, undertook a study to investigate the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on autonomic responses in hypertensives.

Material and methods. Twenty hypertensives were randomly assigned to one of the two experimental groups [control (CG) or exercise (EG)]. The exercise session was conducted on a treadmill and consisted of 40 min of running/walking at 60–70% HRreserve. In the control session, the participants remained seated in a quiet room for 40 min. After the exercise/control sessions, the HRV was recorded continuously for 60 min.

Results. The EG presented an increase with a large effect size for LF [1.0 (post-30) and 1.0 (post-60)] and LF/HF [0.8 (post-30) and 1.1 (post-60)]. Additionally, a reduction with a large effect was observed for HF [–1.0 (post-30) and –1.0 (post-60)].

Conclusion. There is a considerable reduction in post-aerobic-exercise parasympathetic activity and an increase in sympathetic activity. Therefore, a single bout of aerobic exercise is not able to quickly improve the cardiac autonomic regulation.

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Keywords

autonomic nervous system; hypertension; exercise; cardiovascular diseases; endurance training

About this article
Title

Post-aerobic-exercise autonomic responses in hypertensives — a randomized controlled trial

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 24, No 2 (2020)

Pages

74-82

Published online

2020-06-16

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2020.0009

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2020;24(2):74-82.

Keywords

autonomic nervous system
hypertension
exercise
cardiovascular diseases
endurance training

Authors

Juliano Casonatto
Liane Sardi Oliveira
Kamila Grandolfi

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