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Vol 23, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-11-20
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Sleep duration and cardiovascular risk: results of the large-scale epidemiology study ESSE-RF

Mikhail Bochkarev, Lyudmila Korostovtseva, Elena Medvedeva, Oxana Rotar, Yurii Sviryaev, Yulia Zhernakova, Svetlana Shalnova, Alexandra Konradi, Irina Chazova, Sergey Boytsov, Eugene Shlyakhto
DOI: 10.5603/AH.a2019.0017
·
Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(4):248-255.

open access

Vol 23, No 4 (2019)
ORIGINAL PAPERS
Published online: 2019-11-20

Abstract

Background. The recent data suggest that sleep disorders are associated with cardiovascular diseases. We assessed
the relation between self-reported sleep duration and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in the large-scale epidemiological study.

Material and methods. The ESSE-RF is a population-based cross-sectional study involving 22,258 participants aged 25–64 years from 13 regions of the Russian Federation. In 2012–2014, all subjects underwent a structured interview including questions about average daily sleep duration, lifestyle, complaints and diseases. The current analyses considered the associations with the following disorders: obesity, hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke (cerebral thrombosis or hemorrhage) and diabetes mellitus.

Results. Altogether 20,359 respondents were included in the final analysis. The mean self-reported sleep duration was 7.0 h per night: 23.3% participants reported sleeping less than 6 h while 4.5% subjects slept more than 9 h. We found both short and long sleep duration to be associated with self-reported cardiovascular diseases. The association was independent of age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, lipids and glucose levels. The multivariable odds were higher for obesity in short-sleepers compared to those sleeping 7–8 h. In the meanwhile, the association was U-shaped for coronary artery disease. A J-shaped relation was found for myocardial infarction. No relation was found for hypertension, diabetes mellitus or stroke.

Conclusions. Differences in sleep duration may have health consequences given associations between short and long sleep duration and cardiometabolic outcomes.

Abstract

Background. The recent data suggest that sleep disorders are associated with cardiovascular diseases. We assessed
the relation between self-reported sleep duration and cardiovascular and metabolic disorders in the large-scale epidemiological study.

Material and methods. The ESSE-RF is a population-based cross-sectional study involving 22,258 participants aged 25–64 years from 13 regions of the Russian Federation. In 2012–2014, all subjects underwent a structured interview including questions about average daily sleep duration, lifestyle, complaints and diseases. The current analyses considered the associations with the following disorders: obesity, hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, stroke (cerebral thrombosis or hemorrhage) and diabetes mellitus.

Results. Altogether 20,359 respondents were included in the final analysis. The mean self-reported sleep duration was 7.0 h per night: 23.3% participants reported sleeping less than 6 h while 4.5% subjects slept more than 9 h. We found both short and long sleep duration to be associated with self-reported cardiovascular diseases. The association was independent of age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, lipids and glucose levels. The multivariable odds were higher for obesity in short-sleepers compared to those sleeping 7–8 h. In the meanwhile, the association was U-shaped for coronary artery disease. A J-shaped relation was found for myocardial infarction. No relation was found for hypertension, diabetes mellitus or stroke.

Conclusions. Differences in sleep duration may have health consequences given associations between short and long sleep duration and cardiometabolic outcomes.

Get Citation

Keywords

epidemiology; obesity; sleep; risk factors; cardiovascular diseases

About this article
Title

Sleep duration and cardiovascular risk: results of the large-scale epidemiology study ESSE-RF

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 23, No 4 (2019)

Pages

248-255

Published online

2019-11-20

DOI

10.5603/AH.a2019.0017

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2019;23(4):248-255.

Keywords

epidemiology
obesity
sleep
risk factors
cardiovascular diseases

Authors

Mikhail Bochkarev
Lyudmila Korostovtseva
Elena Medvedeva
Oxana Rotar
Yurii Sviryaev
Yulia Zhernakova
Svetlana Shalnova
Alexandra Konradi
Irina Chazova
Sergey Boytsov
Eugene Shlyakhto

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