open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
STATE-OF-THE ART REVIEW
Published online: 2016-12-29
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Antihypertensive treatment in critical limb ischaemia

Anders Gottsäter, Peter M. Nilsson
DOI: 10.5603/AH.2016.0020
·
Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):195-197.

open access

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)
STATE-OF-THE ART REVIEW
Published online: 2016-12-29

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is defined as atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremities, manifesting as intermittent claudication (IC, pain induced by walking) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI, rest pain or ulcerations). PAD guidelines recommend strict control of cardiovascular risk factors, and European guidelines on hypertension recommend a blood pressure (BP) target < 140/90 mm Hg also in PAD patients. As the pressure in the affected extremity might be of relevance for the prognosis concerning limb salvage in CLI, the traditional approach was to avoid beta-blockers and allow a slightly higher BP in CLI. Both theoretical considerations and observational data support aggressive BP lowering also in CLI; however, in the absence of randomized studies on BP lowering in this setting it cannot be definitely established that current recommendations on BP lowering apply also in CLI.

Abstract

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is defined as atherosclerotic arterial occlusive disease of the lower extremities, manifesting as intermittent claudication (IC, pain induced by walking) or critical limb ischaemia (CLI, rest pain or ulcerations). PAD guidelines recommend strict control of cardiovascular risk factors, and European guidelines on hypertension recommend a blood pressure (BP) target < 140/90 mm Hg also in PAD patients. As the pressure in the affected extremity might be of relevance for the prognosis concerning limb salvage in CLI, the traditional approach was to avoid beta-blockers and allow a slightly higher BP in CLI. Both theoretical considerations and observational data support aggressive BP lowering also in CLI; however, in the absence of randomized studies on BP lowering in this setting it cannot be definitely established that current recommendations on BP lowering apply also in CLI.

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Keywords

peripheral artery disease, critical limb ischaemia, blood pressure

About this article
Title

Antihypertensive treatment in critical limb ischaemia

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 20, No 4 (2016)

Pages

195-197

Published online

2016-12-29

DOI

10.5603/AH.2016.0020

Bibliographic record

Arterial Hypertension 2016;20(4):195-197.

Keywords

peripheral artery disease
critical limb ischaemia
blood pressure

Authors

Anders Gottsäter
Peter M. Nilsson

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