open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2010)
REVIEV
Published online: 2010-11-15
Get Citation

Sleep disorders and hypertension

Aleksander Prejbisz, Marek Kabat, Maciej Kluk, Andrzej Januszewicz
Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2010;14(5):411-419.

open access

Vol 14, No 5 (2010)
REVIEV
Published online: 2010-11-15

Abstract

Research on pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular complications of other pathologies, mainly diabetes mellitus and other components of metabolic syndrome, deliver new data on potential cardiovascular risk factors which may be relevant in clinical practice. Particularly intensive research is focused on hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2. It is postulated that sleep disorders might be significant in development of these diseases as well as their cardiovascular complications. One of the most frequent sleep disorders in general population are: obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia and sleep time reduction. Obstructive sleep apnea is a strong and independent risk factor for secondary hypertension, however it is a potentially reversible pathology. Obstructive sleep apnea also co-exists with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Reduction of total sleep time below 7 hours is strongly correlated with the risk for obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. It is worth to be noticed that the same relation has been observed for elongation of total sleep time over 8 hours. It has been also proven that insomnia is correlated with hypertension and its organic complications. Hyperactivation of symphatetic system seems to be a pathogenetic link between sleep disorders and development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and metabolic syndrome. These issues need further research to explain existing ambiguities and confirm pathogenetic relations already shown.
Arterial Hypertension 2010, vol. 14, no 5, pages 411-419.

Abstract

Research on pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases and cardiovascular complications of other pathologies, mainly diabetes mellitus and other components of metabolic syndrome, deliver new data on potential cardiovascular risk factors which may be relevant in clinical practice. Particularly intensive research is focused on hypertension and diabetes mellitus type 2. It is postulated that sleep disorders might be significant in development of these diseases as well as their cardiovascular complications. One of the most frequent sleep disorders in general population are: obstructive sleep apnea, insomnia and sleep time reduction. Obstructive sleep apnea is a strong and independent risk factor for secondary hypertension, however it is a potentially reversible pathology. Obstructive sleep apnea also co-exists with obesity and metabolic syndrome. Reduction of total sleep time below 7 hours is strongly correlated with the risk for obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. It is worth to be noticed that the same relation has been observed for elongation of total sleep time over 8 hours. It has been also proven that insomnia is correlated with hypertension and its organic complications. Hyperactivation of symphatetic system seems to be a pathogenetic link between sleep disorders and development of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity and metabolic syndrome. These issues need further research to explain existing ambiguities and confirm pathogenetic relations already shown.
Arterial Hypertension 2010, vol. 14, no 5, pages 411-419.
Get Citation

Keywords

hypertension; diabetes mellitus; obesity; metabolic syndrome; sleep disorders; insomnia; obturative sleep apnea; sleep time deprivation; sleep time reduction

About this article
Title

Sleep disorders and hypertension

Journal

Arterial Hypertension

Issue

Vol 14, No 5 (2010)

Pages

411-419

Published online

2010-11-15

Bibliographic record

Nadciśnienie tętnicze 2010;14(5):411-419.

Keywords

hypertension
diabetes mellitus
obesity
metabolic syndrome
sleep disorders
insomnia
obturative sleep apnea
sleep time deprivation
sleep time reduction

Authors

Aleksander Prejbisz
Marek Kabat
Maciej Kluk
Andrzej Januszewicz

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

By "Via Medica sp. z o.o." sp.k., ul. Świętokrzyska 73, 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl