open access

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)
Letters to editor
Published online: 2019-03-06
Submitted: 2018-11-15
Accepted: 2019-01-07
Get Citation

Can we regulate endotracheal tube cuff pressure using an anaesthetic machine?

Luis Alberto Tafur, Eduardo Lema-Florez, Andrés Zorrilla-Vaca
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2019.0008
·
Pubmed: 31280555
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2019;51(1):74-76.

open access

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)
Letters to editor
Published online: 2019-03-06
Submitted: 2018-11-15
Accepted: 2019-01-07

Abstract

Endotracheal tube obstruction caused by cuff hyperinflation can be a dangerous but preventable complication of the airway management. Some authors suggest that a trial of cuff deflation should be considered in algorithms for the management of patients with ventilation difficulty. Although it would be a good strategy, we think that preventive measures such as the regulation of the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure warrant further discussion and should be more propagated. It is known that the measurement of the ETT cuff pressure has shown to be useful in the prevention of postoperative pain, hoarseness, aspiration of secretions, subglottic stenosis and tracheal fistulas. However, the routine measurement of the cuff pressure is usually difficult given the low availability of the equipment designed for this purpose, the cost of acquisition, the lack of maintenance-calibration and the risk of cross-infection with use in multiple patients.

Abstract

Endotracheal tube obstruction caused by cuff hyperinflation can be a dangerous but preventable complication of the airway management. Some authors suggest that a trial of cuff deflation should be considered in algorithms for the management of patients with ventilation difficulty. Although it would be a good strategy, we think that preventive measures such as the regulation of the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff pressure warrant further discussion and should be more propagated. It is known that the measurement of the ETT cuff pressure has shown to be useful in the prevention of postoperative pain, hoarseness, aspiration of secretions, subglottic stenosis and tracheal fistulas. However, the routine measurement of the cuff pressure is usually difficult given the low availability of the equipment designed for this purpose, the cost of acquisition, the lack of maintenance-calibration and the risk of cross-infection with use in multiple patients.
Get Citation
About this article
Title

Can we regulate endotracheal tube cuff pressure using an anaesthetic machine?

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)

Pages

74-76

Published online

2019-03-06

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2019.0008

Pubmed

31280555

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2019;51(1):74-76.

Authors

Luis Alberto Tafur
Eduardo Lema-Florez
Andrés Zorrilla-Vaca

References (5)
  1. Zenga J, Galaiya D, Choumanova I, et al. Endotracheal Tube Obstruction Caused by Cuff Hyperinflation. Anesthesiology. 2018; 129(3): 581.
  2. Liu J, Zhang X, Gong W, et al. Correlations between controlled endotracheal tube cuff pressure and postprocedural complications: a multicenter study. Anesth Analg. 2010; 111(5): 1133–1137.
  3. Seegobin RD, van Hasselt GL. Endotracheal cuff pressure and tracheal mucosal blood flow: endoscopic study of effects of four large volume cuffs. Br Med J (Clin Res Ed). 1984; 288(6422): 965–968.
  4. Trivedi L, Jha P, Bajiya NR, et al. We should care more about intracuff pressure: The actual situation in government sector teaching hospital. Indian J Anaesth. 2010; 54(4): 314–317.
  5. Lomholt N. A device for measuring the lateral wall cuff pressure of endotracheal tubes. Acta Anaesthesiol Scand. 1992; 36(8): 775–778.

Important: This website uses cookies. More >>

The cookies allow us to identify your computer and find out details about your last visit. They remembering whether you've visited the site before, so that you remain logged in - or to help us work out how many new website visitors we get each month. Most internet browsers accept cookies automatically, but you can change the settings of your browser to erase cookies or prevent automatic acceptance if you prefer.

VM Media sp. z o.o. VM Group sp.k., Grupa Via Medica, Świętokrzyska 73 St., 80–180 Gdańsk

tel.:+48 58 320 94 94, faks:+48 58 320 94 60, e-mail: viamedica@viamedica.pl