open access

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)
Review articles
Published online: 2019-03-19
Submitted: 2019-01-14
Accepted: 2019-02-01
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Oxygen therapy with high-flow nasal cannulas in children with acute bronchiolitis

Anna Zielińska, Joanna Maria Jassem-Bobowicz, Joanna Kwiatkowska
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2019.0010
·
Pubmed: 31280552
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2019;51(1):51-55.

open access

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)
Review articles
Published online: 2019-03-19
Submitted: 2019-01-14
Accepted: 2019-02-01

Abstract

Acute bronchiolitis is a common disease in children below 24 months of age. The most common aetiology of this disease is a respiratory syncytial virus infection. Since there is no effective treatment for bronchiolitis, supportive therapy alleviating symptoms and preventing respiratory failure is recommended. Oxygen therapy and appropriate nutrition during the disease are considered effective, particularly in severe cases. The choice of oxygen support is crucial. The present paper discusses oxygen therapy using high-flow nasal cannulas. Moreover, the safety of the method, its adverse side effects and practical pre-treatment guidelines are discussed.

Abstract

Acute bronchiolitis is a common disease in children below 24 months of age. The most common aetiology of this disease is a respiratory syncytial virus infection. Since there is no effective treatment for bronchiolitis, supportive therapy alleviating symptoms and preventing respiratory failure is recommended. Oxygen therapy and appropriate nutrition during the disease are considered effective, particularly in severe cases. The choice of oxygen support is crucial. The present paper discusses oxygen therapy using high-flow nasal cannulas. Moreover, the safety of the method, its adverse side effects and practical pre-treatment guidelines are discussed.
Get Citation

Keywords

bronchiolitis; non-invasive respiratory support; high-flow nasal cannulas; HFNC; oxygen therapy

About this article
Title

Oxygen therapy with high-flow nasal cannulas in children with acute bronchiolitis

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 51, No 1 (2019)

Pages

51-55

Published online

2019-03-19

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2019.0010

Pubmed

31280552

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2019;51(1):51-55.

Keywords

bronchiolitis
non-invasive respiratory support
high-flow nasal cannulas
HFNC
oxygen therapy

Authors

Anna Zielińska
Joanna Maria Jassem-Bobowicz
Joanna Kwiatkowska

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