open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2018-10-08
Submitted: 2018-04-06
Accepted: 2018-08-04
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Use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation with pressure support guaranteed with average volume in de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure. A pilot study

Killen Harold Briones-Claudett, Antonio Esquinas Rodriguez, Mónica H Briones-Claudett, Miguel Puga-Tejada, Mariuxi del Pilar Cabrera Baños, Christian Roberto Pazmiño Dueñas, Carlos Israel Torres Herrera, Michelle Grunauer
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2018.0036
·
Pubmed: 30317536
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):283-290.

open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2018-10-08
Submitted: 2018-04-06
Accepted: 2018-08-04

Abstract

Background: This study was designed to determine the results associated with the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) using the BiPAP S/T-AVAPS ventilation strategy in subjects with mild to moderate de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Methods: This is a prospective study that includes subjects with de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure (not produced by acute exacerbations of COPD, chronic lung disease, or congestive heart failure) with mild to moderate PaO2/FiO2, who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Santa Maria Clinic in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Subjects were divided into two groups and compared according to their PaO2/FiO2: higher than 100 and up to 200 mm Hg (moderate ARDS) or between 200 and 300 mm Hg (mild ARDS) (both groups were ventilated with the BiPAP S/T-AVAPS strategy). A value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 38 subjects were analysed in this study. The total rate of intubation was 34.2% while the mortality rate was 28.9%. Significant differences were observed when comparing success versus failure in exhaled tidal volumes (P = 0.04), peak inspired pressure (P < 0.001), PaO2 (P < 0.001), SaO2 (P < 0.002), PaO2/FiO2 (P < 0.002), RR (P < 0.001), HR (P < 0.001), and inspiratory time (P = 0.029) measured at baseline and at 12-hour, 24-hour and 48-hour intervals. Conclusion: The BiPAP S/T-AVAPS ventilatory mode can be used in subjects with de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure with special vigilance concerning exhaled tidal volumes and inspired pressure.

Abstract

Background: This study was designed to determine the results associated with the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation (NIV) using the BiPAP S/T-AVAPS ventilation strategy in subjects with mild to moderate de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure. Methods: This is a prospective study that includes subjects with de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure (not produced by acute exacerbations of COPD, chronic lung disease, or congestive heart failure) with mild to moderate PaO2/FiO2, who were admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of Santa Maria Clinic in Guayaquil, Ecuador. Subjects were divided into two groups and compared according to their PaO2/FiO2: higher than 100 and up to 200 mm Hg (moderate ARDS) or between 200 and 300 mm Hg (mild ARDS) (both groups were ventilated with the BiPAP S/T-AVAPS strategy). A value of P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A total of 38 subjects were analysed in this study. The total rate of intubation was 34.2% while the mortality rate was 28.9%. Significant differences were observed when comparing success versus failure in exhaled tidal volumes (P = 0.04), peak inspired pressure (P < 0.001), PaO2 (P < 0.001), SaO2 (P < 0.002), PaO2/FiO2 (P < 0.002), RR (P < 0.001), HR (P < 0.001), and inspiratory time (P = 0.029) measured at baseline and at 12-hour, 24-hour and 48-hour intervals. Conclusion: The BiPAP S/T-AVAPS ventilatory mode can be used in subjects with de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure with special vigilance concerning exhaled tidal volumes and inspired pressure.
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Keywords

mechanical ventilation, noninvasive; respiratory failure, acute, de novo; pressure support guaranteed with average volume

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Title

Use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation with pressure support guaranteed with average volume in de novo hypoxaemic respiratory failure. A pilot study

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)

Pages

283-290

Published online

2018-10-08

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2018.0036

Pubmed

30317536

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):283-290.

Keywords

mechanical ventilation
noninvasive
respiratory failure
acute
de novo
pressure support guaranteed with average volume

Authors

Killen Harold Briones-Claudett
Antonio Esquinas Rodriguez
Mónica H Briones-Claudett
Miguel Puga-Tejada
Mariuxi del Pilar Cabrera Baños
Christian Roberto Pazmiño Dueñas
Carlos Israel Torres Herrera
Michelle Grunauer

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