open access

Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Special articles
Published online: 2018-06-26
Submitted: 2018-01-05
Accepted: 2018-05-25
Get Citation

Revisiting the anaesthesiologist’s role during organ procurement

Gali Katznelson, Gali Katznelson, Hance Clarke
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2018.0015
·
Pubmed: 29953571
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(2):91-94.

open access

Vol 50, No 2 (2018)
Special articles
Published online: 2018-06-26
Submitted: 2018-01-05
Accepted: 2018-05-25

Abstract

As organ transplantation science continues to mature, both physicians and the public face challenges defining death
and, subsequently, caring for an individual when they are deemed eligible for organ procurement. This paper revisits
the anaesthesiologist’s role with respect to the provision of analgesic medication at the time of organ procurement.
It provides a historical overview of the ethics of organ procurement, explaining how the definition of brain death and
the ethical principle of the ‘dead donor rule’ have shaped the practice of organ procurement. It concludes by suggesting
that a re-framing of the ethics of organ procurement may be necessary in order for anaesthesiologists to meet
their ethical obligation of preventing harm to organ donors while maintaining public trust in the medical profession.

Abstract

As organ transplantation science continues to mature, both physicians and the public face challenges defining death
and, subsequently, caring for an individual when they are deemed eligible for organ procurement. This paper revisits
the anaesthesiologist’s role with respect to the provision of analgesic medication at the time of organ procurement.
It provides a historical overview of the ethics of organ procurement, explaining how the definition of brain death and
the ethical principle of the ‘dead donor rule’ have shaped the practice of organ procurement. It concludes by suggesting
that a re-framing of the ethics of organ procurement may be necessary in order for anaesthesiologists to meet
their ethical obligation of preventing harm to organ donors while maintaining public trust in the medical profession.

Get Citation

Keywords

organ procurement; analgesia

About this article
Title

Revisiting the anaesthesiologist’s role during organ procurement

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 50, No 2 (2018)

Pages

91-94

Published online

2018-06-26

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2018.0015

Pubmed

29953571

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(2):91-94.

Keywords

organ procurement
analgesia

Authors

Gali Katznelson
Gali Katznelson
Hance Clarke

References (24)
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