open access

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-11-18
Submitted: 2017-10-16
Accepted: 2017-11-11
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Lung ultrasound in the critically ill (LUCI): A translational discipline

Daniel A. Lichtenstein, Manu L.N.G. Malbrain
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0063
·
Pubmed: 29151003
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):430-436.

open access

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-11-18
Submitted: 2017-10-16
Accepted: 2017-11-11

Abstract

In the early days of ultrasound, it was not a translational discipline. The heart was claimed by cardiologists, with others, such as gynaecologists, urologists and vascular surgeons claiming their part while the rest was given to radiologists. Only recently, ultrasound transgressed and crossed the usual borders between the different disciplines, such as emergency and critical care medicine. The advent of portable machines in the early 1980s, allowed the critical care physician to perform bedside ultrasound, and the development of whole body critical care ultrasound (CCUS) was born. It may sound cynical that radiologists were the first to state that diagnostic sonography was truly the next stethoscope: poorly utilized by many but understood by few. Exactly the same radiologists then abandoned the use of ultrasound outside the radiology department, leaving a vast domain to other disciplines eager to welcome the modern stethoscope. In this review, we list the possibilities of lung ultrasound as a translational holistic discipline.

Abstract

In the early days of ultrasound, it was not a translational discipline. The heart was claimed by cardiologists, with others, such as gynaecologists, urologists and vascular surgeons claiming their part while the rest was given to radiologists. Only recently, ultrasound transgressed and crossed the usual borders between the different disciplines, such as emergency and critical care medicine. The advent of portable machines in the early 1980s, allowed the critical care physician to perform bedside ultrasound, and the development of whole body critical care ultrasound (CCUS) was born. It may sound cynical that radiologists were the first to state that diagnostic sonography was truly the next stethoscope: poorly utilized by many but understood by few. Exactly the same radiologists then abandoned the use of ultrasound outside the radiology department, leaving a vast domain to other disciplines eager to welcome the modern stethoscope. In this review, we list the possibilities of lung ultrasound as a translational holistic discipline.
Get Citation

Keywords

lung, ultrasound; holistic; medicine, translational; CCUS; POCUS

About this article
Title

Lung ultrasound in the critically ill (LUCI): A translational discipline

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)

Pages

430-436

Published online

2017-11-18

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0063

Pubmed

29151003

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):430-436.

Keywords

lung
ultrasound
holistic
medicine
translational
CCUS
POCUS

Authors

Daniel A. Lichtenstein
Manu L.N.G. Malbrain

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