open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-11-22
Submitted: 2017-10-11
Accepted: 2017-11-11
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Cardiac ultrasound: a true haemodynamic monitor?

Jan Poelaert, Manu L.N.G. Malbrain
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0068
·
Pubmed: 29165778
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):303-310.

open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-11-22
Submitted: 2017-10-11
Accepted: 2017-11-11

Abstract

Cardiac ultrasound has been used in the critically ill for more than thirty years. The technology has made enormous progression with respect to image quality and quantity, various Doppler techniques, as well as connectivity, the transfer of data and offline calculations. Some consider cardiac ultrasound as the stethoscope of the Twenty-first century. The potential of eye-balling moving cardiac structures gives undeniable power to this diagnostic and monitoring tool. The main shortcoming is the discontinuous mode of monitoring and the fact that optimal information acquisition can only be obtained when one is well-trained and experienced. Cardiac ultrasound has become an indispensable tool, especially in haemodynamically unstable patients. This review summarizes some important aspects of cardiac ultrasound with use of Doppler monitoring for assessment of the three most important pillars of haemodynamics, namely cardiac preload, afterload and contractile function.

Abstract

Cardiac ultrasound has been used in the critically ill for more than thirty years. The technology has made enormous progression with respect to image quality and quantity, various Doppler techniques, as well as connectivity, the transfer of data and offline calculations. Some consider cardiac ultrasound as the stethoscope of the Twenty-first century. The potential of eye-balling moving cardiac structures gives undeniable power to this diagnostic and monitoring tool. The main shortcoming is the discontinuous mode of monitoring and the fact that optimal information acquisition can only be obtained when one is well-trained and experienced. Cardiac ultrasound has become an indispensable tool, especially in haemodynamically unstable patients. This review summarizes some important aspects of cardiac ultrasound with use of Doppler monitoring for assessment of the three most important pillars of haemodynamics, namely cardiac preload, afterload and contractile function.
Get Citation

Keywords

echocardiography; cardiac ultrasound; preload; afterload; contractility; vascular resistance; cardiac output

About this article
Title

Cardiac ultrasound: a true haemodynamic monitor?

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)

Pages

303-310

Published online

2017-11-22

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0068

Pubmed

29165778

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):303-310.

Keywords

echocardiography
cardiac ultrasound
preload
afterload
contractility
vascular resistance
cardiac output

Authors

Jan Poelaert
Manu L.N.G. Malbrain

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