open access

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-12-01
Submitted: 2017-10-09
Accepted: 2017-11-18
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Executive summary on the use of ultrasound in the critically ill: consensus report from the 3rd Course on Acute Care Ultrasound (CACU)

Manu L.N.G. Malbrain, Brecht De Tavernier, Sandrine Haverals, Michel Slama, Antoine Vieillard-Baron, Adrian Wong, Jan Poelaert, Xavier Monnet, Willem Stockman, Paul Elbers, Daniel Lichtenstein
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0072
·
Pubmed: 29192422
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):393-411.

open access

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-12-01
Submitted: 2017-10-09
Accepted: 2017-11-18

Abstract

Over the past decades, ultrasound (US) has gained its place in the armamentarium of monitoring tools in the intensive care unit (ICU). Critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) is the combination of general CCUS (lung and pleural, abdominal, vascular) and CC echocardiography, allowing prompt assessment and diagnosis in combination with vascular access and therapeutic intervention. This review summarises the findings, challenges lessons from the 3rd Course on Acute Care Ultrasound (CACU) held in November 2015, Antwerp, Belgium. It covers the different modalities of CCUS; touching on the various aspects of training, clinical benefits and potential benefits. Despite the benefits of CCUS, numerous challenges remain, including the delivery of CCUS training to future intensivists. Some of these are discussed along with potential solutions from a number of national European professional societies. There is a need for an international agreed consensus on what modalities are necessary and how best to deliver training in CCUS.

Abstract

Over the past decades, ultrasound (US) has gained its place in the armamentarium of monitoring tools in the intensive care unit (ICU). Critical care ultrasonography (CCUS) is the combination of general CCUS (lung and pleural, abdominal, vascular) and CC echocardiography, allowing prompt assessment and diagnosis in combination with vascular access and therapeutic intervention. This review summarises the findings, challenges lessons from the 3rd Course on Acute Care Ultrasound (CACU) held in November 2015, Antwerp, Belgium. It covers the different modalities of CCUS; touching on the various aspects of training, clinical benefits and potential benefits. Despite the benefits of CCUS, numerous challenges remain, including the delivery of CCUS training to future intensivists. Some of these are discussed along with potential solutions from a number of national European professional societies. There is a need for an international agreed consensus on what modalities are necessary and how best to deliver training in CCUS.
Get Citation

Keywords

fluid therapy, ultrasound, CCUS, critical care ultrasound, POCUS, point-of-care ultrasound, training, transthoracic, transesophageal, abdominal, lung, vascular, resuscitation, monitoring, fluid responsiveness

About this article
Title

Executive summary on the use of ultrasound in the critically ill: consensus report from the 3rd Course on Acute Care Ultrasound (CACU)

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 5 (2017)

Pages

393-411

Published online

2017-12-01

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0072

Pubmed

29192422

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(5):393-411.

Keywords

fluid therapy
ultrasound
CCUS
critical care ultrasound
POCUS
point-of-care ultrasound
training
transthoracic
transesophageal
abdominal
lung
vascular
resuscitation
monitoring
fluid responsiveness

Authors

Manu L.N.G. Malbrain
Brecht De Tavernier
Sandrine Haverals
Michel Slama
Antoine Vieillard-Baron
Adrian Wong
Jan Poelaert
Xavier Monnet
Willem Stockman
Paul Elbers
Daniel Lichtenstein

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