open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2018-10-04
Submitted: 2017-10-09
Accepted: 2018-06-13
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Postoperative pain after spinal surgery in the paediatric population

Barbara Kościelniak-Merak, Ilona Batko, Krzysztof Kobylarz, Przemysław Tomasik
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2018.0034
·
Pubmed: 30284715
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):252-258.

open access

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2018-10-04
Submitted: 2017-10-09
Accepted: 2018-06-13

Abstract

Introduction: Postoperative pain is a major aftereffect of surgery. Especially severe occurs after extensive operations within the spine. The goal of the study was to investigate the laboratory predictive factors of intensive postoperative pain in children undergoing extensive surgery Patients and methods: We recruited 41 children, age median 13 years (IQR:10-15 years) undergoing extensive spine surgery. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the intensity of postoperative pain measured using the 10-point numerical rating scale (NRS), visual analog scale (VAS) or faces pain scale-revised (FPS-R). Patients with a score of 5 or higher were included in the study group and those with NRS of less than 5 were included in the control group. We collected detailed clinical and laboratory data before, during and after surgery. Results: The highest intensity of pain was observed in the first 6 hours after surgery. The postoperative pain was associated with a higher drop in hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit level in peri-operative period (p=0.006 and p=0.019 respectively) as well as higher changes in mean arterial pressure during surgery. Additionally, we found that children with intensive pain had higher total protein concentration after surgery. Conclusions: We reported that the drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit level, fluctuation in mean arterial pressure as well as total protein concentration could be useful prognostic factors of early postoperative pain.

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Abstract

Introduction: Postoperative pain is a major aftereffect of surgery. Especially severe occurs after extensive operations within the spine. The goal of the study was to investigate the laboratory predictive factors of intensive postoperative pain in children undergoing extensive surgery Patients and methods: We recruited 41 children, age median 13 years (IQR:10-15 years) undergoing extensive spine surgery. The subjects were divided into two groups based on the intensity of postoperative pain measured using the 10-point numerical rating scale (NRS), visual analog scale (VAS) or faces pain scale-revised (FPS-R). Patients with a score of 5 or higher were included in the study group and those with NRS of less than 5 were included in the control group. We collected detailed clinical and laboratory data before, during and after surgery. Results: The highest intensity of pain was observed in the first 6 hours after surgery. The postoperative pain was associated with a higher drop in hemoglobin concentration and hematocrit level in peri-operative period (p=0.006 and p=0.019 respectively) as well as higher changes in mean arterial pressure during surgery. Additionally, we found that children with intensive pain had higher total protein concentration after surgery. Conclusions: We reported that the drop in hemoglobin and hematocrit level, fluctuation in mean arterial pressure as well as total protein concentration could be useful prognostic factors of early postoperative pain.

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Keywords

children; surgery, spine; pain, postoperative; pain, intensity

About this article
Title

Postoperative pain after spinal surgery in the paediatric population

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 50, No 4 (2018)

Pages

252-258

Published online

2018-10-04

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2018.0034

Pubmed

30284715

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2018;50(4):252-258.

Keywords

children
surgery
spine
pain
postoperative
pain
intensity

Authors

Barbara Kościelniak-Merak
Ilona Batko
Krzysztof Kobylarz
Przemysław Tomasik

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