open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-09-18
Submitted: 2017-07-12
Accepted: 2017-08-20
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Noninvasive ventilation in difficult endotracheal intubation: systematic and review analysis

Igor Barjaktarevic, Antonio M. Esquinas, Frances Mae West, Jeffrey Albores, David Berlin
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0044
·
Pubmed: 28920633
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(4):294-302.

open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-09-18
Submitted: 2017-07-12
Accepted: 2017-08-20

Abstract

Noninvasive ventilation has been widely used in the management of acute respiratory failure in appropriate clinical settings. In addition to known benefit of alleviating the need for invasive mechanical ventilation, recent literature suggested its beneficial use in the process of endotracheal intubation.

Search of the PubMed database and manual review of selected articles investigating the methods and outcomes of endotracheal intubation in difficult airway due to hypoxemic respiratory failure and the role of noninvasive ventilation in this process.

Large randomized controlled studies focused on alternative approaches to endotracheal intubation in severe hypoxemic respiratory failure are largely missing but there are several retrospective cohort analysis and reports describing the novel technique describing the application of noninvasive ventilation during endotracheal intubation.

Noninvasive ventilation can be used as an adjunct intervention that may maintain oxygenation and ventilation, prevent significant hemodynamic instability and provide a pneumatic stent to maintain upper airway patency, thus reducing the risks of intubation-related complications.

Abstract

Noninvasive ventilation has been widely used in the management of acute respiratory failure in appropriate clinical settings. In addition to known benefit of alleviating the need for invasive mechanical ventilation, recent literature suggested its beneficial use in the process of endotracheal intubation.

Search of the PubMed database and manual review of selected articles investigating the methods and outcomes of endotracheal intubation in difficult airway due to hypoxemic respiratory failure and the role of noninvasive ventilation in this process.

Large randomized controlled studies focused on alternative approaches to endotracheal intubation in severe hypoxemic respiratory failure are largely missing but there are several retrospective cohort analysis and reports describing the novel technique describing the application of noninvasive ventilation during endotracheal intubation.

Noninvasive ventilation can be used as an adjunct intervention that may maintain oxygenation and ventilation, prevent significant hemodynamic instability and provide a pneumatic stent to maintain upper airway patency, thus reducing the risks of intubation-related complications.

Get Citation

Keywords

airway, difficult; endotracheal intubation, difficult; noninvasive ventilation; awake bronchoscopic intubation

About this article
Title

Noninvasive ventilation in difficult endotracheal intubation: systematic and review analysis

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)

Pages

294-302

Published online

2017-09-18

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0044

Pubmed

28920633

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(4):294-302.

Keywords

airway
difficult
endotracheal intubation
difficult
noninvasive ventilation
awake bronchoscopic intubation

Authors

Igor Barjaktarevic
Antonio M. Esquinas
Frances Mae West
Jeffrey Albores
David Berlin

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