open access

Vol 49, No 3 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-08-12
Submitted: 2017-05-06
Accepted: 2017-06-19
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Thermoregulation disorders of central origin — how to diagnose and treat

Marta Zawadzka, Marta Szmuda, Maria Mazurkiewicz-Bełdzińska
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.2017.0042
·
Pubmed: 28803441
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(3):227-234.

open access

Vol 49, No 3 (2017)
Review articles
Published online: 2017-08-12
Submitted: 2017-05-06
Accepted: 2017-06-19

Abstract

Fever is a common symptom in the Intensive Care Unit. At least half of febrile episodes are caused by infection. Excluding infectious etiology and other non-infectious causes of fever, especially in patients with central nervous system (CNS) disorders, attention should be paid to disturbances of thermoregulatory centre. In particular, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral trauma, along with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke are strongly associated with the development of central fever. Proper, speedy diagnosis of the cause of fever makes it possible to implement preventive measures against the harmful effects of hyperthermia on the CNS and to avoid the consequences of inappropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to present the current treatment options for the management of central fever and to analyze recent recommendations for the treatment of hyperthermia, including the use of hypothermia. The recommendations of American and European associations are inconsistent, mainly due to the lack of randomized clinical trials confirming the effectiveness of such treatment. The diagnosis of central fever is still made by the exclusion of other causes. The authors of the review intended to present the characteristic features of central fever, differentiating this state from infectious fever and also analyze the presence of central fever in particular neurological diseases. It seems particularly important to establish diagnostic criteria for central fever or to find diagnostic markers. It is also necessary to conduct further randomized clinical trials evaluating the indications for treatment of hyperthermia.

Abstract

Fever is a common symptom in the Intensive Care Unit. At least half of febrile episodes are caused by infection. Excluding infectious etiology and other non-infectious causes of fever, especially in patients with central nervous system (CNS) disorders, attention should be paid to disturbances of thermoregulatory centre. In particular, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral trauma, along with ischaemic or haemorrhagic stroke are strongly associated with the development of central fever. Proper, speedy diagnosis of the cause of fever makes it possible to implement preventive measures against the harmful effects of hyperthermia on the CNS and to avoid the consequences of inappropriate treatment. The aim of this review is to present the current treatment options for the management of central fever and to analyze recent recommendations for the treatment of hyperthermia, including the use of hypothermia. The recommendations of American and European associations are inconsistent, mainly due to the lack of randomized clinical trials confirming the effectiveness of such treatment. The diagnosis of central fever is still made by the exclusion of other causes. The authors of the review intended to present the characteristic features of central fever, differentiating this state from infectious fever and also analyze the presence of central fever in particular neurological diseases. It seems particularly important to establish diagnostic criteria for central fever or to find diagnostic markers. It is also necessary to conduct further randomized clinical trials evaluating the indications for treatment of hyperthermia.

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Keywords

central fever, diagnosis, treatment

About this article
Title

Thermoregulation disorders of central origin — how to diagnose and treat

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 3 (2017)

Pages

227-234

Published online

2017-08-12

DOI

10.5603/AIT.2017.0042

Pubmed

28803441

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(3):227-234.

Keywords

central fever
diagnosis
treatment

Authors

Marta Zawadzka
Marta Szmuda
Maria Mazurkiewicz-Bełdzińska

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