open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-10-13
Submitted: 2017-04-26
Accepted: 2017-09-16
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Pulmonary complications after non-cardiac surgeries: temporal patterns and risk factors

Cássia Toledo, Flávio Eduardo Nácul, Marcos Freitas Knibel, Nilton Brandão Silva, Ederlon Rezende, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho Grion, Murillo Assunção, Fernando Gutierrez, Joelma Villafanha Gandolfi, Suzana Margareth Lobo
DOI: 10.5603/AIT.a2017.0055
·
Pubmed: 29027656
·
Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(4):245-251.

open access

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)
Original and clinical articles
Published online: 2017-10-13
Submitted: 2017-04-26
Accepted: 2017-09-16

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Postoperative complications are the primary determinants of survival following major surgery. We aimed to characterize the early perioperative risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications (POPCs) in patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgeries. METHODS: This study utilized a multicenter prospective observational cohort design. Adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgeries and admitted to 21 Brazilian ICUs were screened for inclusion in the study. POPCs were defined as the presence of acute pulmonary oedema, nosocomial pneumonia, and extubation failure in the postoperative period. RESULTS: Of the 581 patients enrolled, 110 (19%) had at least one POPC, of whom 5% had acute pulmonary oedema, 10% extubation failure while 10% had pneumonia. Most cases of pulmonary oedema occurred in the first week after surgery, while pneumonia was more frequently a later occurrence. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the group with POPCs compared to the group of patients without POPCs (62% vs. 11%, RR: 5.1, 95% CI: 4.23–7.69; P < 0.001). A low functional capacity (RR: 4.6, 95% CI: 2.1–10.0), major surgery (RR: 3.6, 95% CI: 1.2–10.7), preoperative hemodynamic instability (RR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1–10.6), alcoholism (RR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0–10.7), unplanned surgery (RR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0–5.2), the SOFA score (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.2), and increased central venous pressure (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.1) were independent predictors of POPCs. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary complications are common in intensive care units after major non-cardiac surgeries. Awareness of the risk factors for POPCs may help multidisciplinary teams develop strategies to prevent these complications.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Postoperative complications are the primary determinants of survival following major surgery. We aimed to characterize the early perioperative risk factors for postoperative pulmonary complications (POPCs) in patients undergoing major non-cardiac surgeries. METHODS: This study utilized a multicenter prospective observational cohort design. Adult patients undergoing non-cardiac surgeries and admitted to 21 Brazilian ICUs were screened for inclusion in the study. POPCs were defined as the presence of acute pulmonary oedema, nosocomial pneumonia, and extubation failure in the postoperative period. RESULTS: Of the 581 patients enrolled, 110 (19%) had at least one POPC, of whom 5% had acute pulmonary oedema, 10% extubation failure while 10% had pneumonia. Most cases of pulmonary oedema occurred in the first week after surgery, while pneumonia was more frequently a later occurrence. The mortality rate was significantly higher in the group with POPCs compared to the group of patients without POPCs (62% vs. 11%, RR: 5.1, 95% CI: 4.23–7.69; P < 0.001). A low functional capacity (RR: 4.6, 95% CI: 2.1–10.0), major surgery (RR: 3.6, 95% CI: 1.2–10.7), preoperative hemodynamic instability (RR: 3.4, 95% CI: 1.1–10.6), alcoholism (RR: 3.3, 95% CI: 1.0–10.7), unplanned surgery (RR: 2.3, 95% CI: 1.0–5.2), the SOFA score (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.2), and increased central venous pressure (RR: 1.1, 95% CI: 1.0–1.1) were independent predictors of POPCs. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary complications are common in intensive care units after major non-cardiac surgeries. Awareness of the risk factors for POPCs may help multidisciplinary teams develop strategies to prevent these complications.
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Keywords

pulmonary complications, postoperative; pneumonia; pulmonary oedema; extubation failure

About this article
Title

Pulmonary complications after non-cardiac surgeries: temporal patterns and risk factors

Journal

Anaesthesiology Intensive Therapy

Issue

Vol 49, No 4 (2017)

Pages

245-251

Published online

2017-10-13

DOI

10.5603/AIT.a2017.0055

Pubmed

29027656

Bibliographic record

Anaesthesiol Intensive Ther 2017;49(4):245-251.

Keywords

pulmonary complications
postoperative
pneumonia
pulmonary oedema
extubation failure

Authors

Cássia Toledo
Flávio Eduardo Nácul
Marcos Freitas Knibel
Nilton Brandão Silva
Ederlon Rezende
Cintia Magalhães Carvalho Grion
Murillo Assunção
Fernando Gutierrez
Joelma Villafanha Gandolfi
Suzana Margareth Lobo

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